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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been after these pesky stripers for 8 years and I have only boated 3 fish. I have put some time on the water thats for sure. I would like to start reaping the rewards of my time investment! I thought it may be helpful to put together some tips for the new angler so they can have an idea of how to catch these suckers! Maybe it will help cut down on the time investment and help people to catch some fish earlier.

What are the basics for fishing from the boat? What to look for in a good "Hot Spot."

How to rig your line?

Temps, time of day, tide, and anything else that is basic.

I'm not looking for secrets unless your willing to share. Im just looking for any help I can get to make my fishing experience more enjoyable and boat a few more fish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I think one of my issues is presentation. Heres what I have been doing.

Circle hook to about 6 inches of line hooked to a snap swivel hooked to braided with a fish finder rig on. I cast that out and then pull the line tight so the fish finder it against the snap swivel.

Here's my new, un tried method-

Large Circle hook snelled to 36 inches of 25 lb florocarbon tied to a swivel then another 8 inches of florocarbon with a fish finder rig on it that is then tied to another swivel which will be tied to my braided line.

which one is better?
 

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It still sounds complex to me...

This is what I do.

Hook--3-5 feet line<--barrel swivel-->mainline with fishfinder on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Should I float the main channel? Anchor off on the side? Deeper parts? Shallower parts? Around bends? Near obstacles on the bottom? Over thinking too much?
 

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Large Circle hook snelled to 36 inches of 25 lb florocarbon tied to a swivel then another 8 inches of florocarbon with a fish finder rig on it that is then tied to another swivel which will be tied to my braided line.
If I'm understanding this correctly, you're going to put the fishfinder on 8 inches of line between 2 swivels. If that's correct, you might as well just use a 3 way, because your fishfinder isn't going to be able to slide far enough on the line to achieve its intended purpose.
 

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During low tide try right on the edge of the channel about 20 to 30 feet deep, with your bait at different depths ranging from right on the bottom to 8 to 10 feet up. During high tide move into some shallower water, around 10 to 15 feet right on the bottom. Some other things to look for are rocky points and structure, they love the rocks. As far as your rig is concerned it sounds way too complicated to me. Run 3 to 5 feet of leader with a swivel and your slide on your main line. I hope this helps,good luck!
 

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Where should you hook a live herring?
Should you hook it different if your fishing the bottom or suspended?
Thanks
 

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I use 25lb test mono with fish finder rig with 3-5 ounce weight to barrel swivel then a 3ft 25lb floro leader and a 6/0 circle hook in red. I fish with live and fresh chunck, 90% of my fish have been on fresh chunk. I also tend to fish 20ft depth, up and albany I find I catch more fish at this depth, and have my best luck an hour before to hour after slack, and when I catch them I usually catch multiple within an hour time frame, then nothing. It's definetly a learning curve, but catching more and more fish each year. A lot of people suggest to stay out of high traffic areas and to change your bait often, and it has been working this year. I now have 4 go to spots where I have caught multiple fish on different outings. Good luck, and stick with it. Fwiw everyone likes to fish up by Troy dam up here but I have yet to catch a striper up there, and it's rocky up there and snap bottom a lot.
 

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Tyee
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keep it simple,they're fish not rocket scientists,7/0 octopus,2 ft 30 lb Floro,barel,bead and slide,put on bottom if you want bigger fish,suspend it if you want schoolies,deeper as water warms up,but watch what other boats r doin,there may b a reason why all the boats are in the same spot,keep trying different things,you'll get em.tight lines
 

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Biglurr54:

I'm no expert, but here is what I have learned over the last 20 years:

1. The basics of fishing from a boat for stripers in the Hudson are the same as for any other species. Safety first.
2. In terms of 'hotspots,' think of the Hudson as a giant trout stream, with really big trout that eat big bait. Plus, a daily water level fluctuation of 5 feet, twice a day. And big ships. Edges are always best. Deep spots. Current. Bait. I presume you have a fish finder, trust it all those beeps you are seeing are fish.
3. I use a slider rig on a 5' boat pole with conventional reel, drop it strait down, let the current carry it til it bottoms out. If it don't, add more weight.
Circle hook, 36" leader, barrel, line. I will also use a spinning real that I can cast well in back, put a 3 way on that. Experiment with the length of the sinker dropper, use 36 in. leader on circle hook. I always hook them in back of the dorsal, below the spinal cord. Or cut them into 3-4 pieces. Fifteen minutes a piece. I don't drift much so can't make any recommendations there. Have caught them on lures up at the dam.
4. Temps, tide etc. are out of your control. Go fishing when its convenient for you. I have caught them in every time, tide, weather. Sure, some may be better than others but there is no substitute for time on the water. "Put in the bait and wait."
5. If you live local, go in the summer a few times if you don't already, particularly at low tide. Use the depth finder. Troy dam area is pretty interesting at low tide in August. I think what you see will help your efforts during the spring run.
6. So far this year I have gotten 6 in the boat, six times as many as I caught in the previous two years. If I was going fishing to catch fish I would have quit years ago.
7. Last, use big circle hooks. All six I caught were in the corner of the mouth. Released 5 unharmed. Leave your drag loose, just tight enough that the current doesn't take it. Secure the rod to the boat. When it hits you will know it, pick up the rod, deal with the loose drag by cupping or thumbing the spool and adjusting the drag, let the fish run some and then start gathering line, don't try to set the hook with circle hooks, just start reeling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Awesome everyone. Thank you for your advice. When you say suspend bait for schoolies. How do you suspend the bait? Also I see some guys say hook line swivel bead then fish finder. What's the point of the bead?
 

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As I understand it the point of the bead is to protect the knot tying your line onto the barrel swivel. The sliding weight banging into that knot over and over can damage it. I use a crimped split shot about 3 inches above the swivel knot but have to keep moving it back into position as it works its way down to the swivel.

To suspend, use a lighter weight depending on current speed, or a longer sinker dropper on a 3 way. Lets say the leader on the hook is 3 feet, the current is real fast on a falling tide. With a 3 foot dropper on the sinker, if the sinker is heavy enough to hold bottom then the current should carry the bait about 3 feet high in the water column. I have seen guys use a six foot leader on the hook and a six foot dropper. Can be a tangled mess however if the bait starts spinning in the current. Which is why my go-to is a three foot leader on the hook and a 6-12 inch dropper. Or a slider of similar dimensions.
 

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I have a couple different methods which work depending where I am. If I am fishing where the channel is deep with steep edges I'll fish right at the channel edge at the outside of the curve. I use a fishfinder rig and drop live herring right over the edge on outgoing tide. I find the bass tend to sit there and wait for the herring as they go back into the channel I outgoing tides.

I'll also fish above structure and bridge pilons. The bass tend to sit there again where there is current and catch the herring as they come down...remember stripers can be lazy and want the bait to come to them.

When the channel is flat and sandy I'll find the thermocline (with my Humminbird fishfinder) and fish that with sand and blood worms. I usually find this is between 15-18 feet down. One foot above or below this and I'll get zero whereas within this range I'll hit 10 or 20. The nice thing about bloods and sands here is you don't get the garbage fish taking your bait as when it lies toward the bottom.

Finally in the shallow areas......5-12 feet...I'll use a balloon rig to float live herring with about 6-8 feet of line.....it's real cool to watch your balloon disappear when the herring is hit.

I've caught stripers up at the dam but it's aggravating to be up there in a boat with the strong current and rocks.....watch the cable when anchoring. Most of my buddies have better luck up there at night with white jigs from shore.

As for when to fish....I seem to have the best luck just before and after high tide and when it's cloudy out.
 
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