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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Being new to the stripers... i got a couple questions about the differences.

in your opinons which are better: sand/blood worms or eels?

live over artificial right?

and does it make a differnce whether it's like a back bay type or surf?

thanks guys i appreciate all the input and help.
:smiliegrd::thu:
 

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Well i personally prefer Eels.
They are good for the river in May,
and deadly during the winter months for stripers in the ocean.
The bad thing is really only big bass will hit them, you cant go out and have fun with schoolies.

Sandworms are great for in the bay, i had some luck with them in the surf.
Sandworms in the bay are good because anything will hit them
Fluke, weakfish, croacker, STRIPERS.
I wouldnt use them in the ocean.

Bloodworms are ehh. I only use them for winter flounders.

By the way...ALWAYS GO ALL NATURAL. I never use artifical for stripes unless it is jerk shad or lures. Live and fresh bait for stripers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
:thu:thanks for info it helps a lot. i will definately conisder it... all advice welcome. i won't favor one over the other just every opinion helps me narrow it down

:smiliegrd:
 

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hee hee lol,,
are you really new to this thing?
listen to me...
no matter what question you have you just have to type in the search option and you will get tons of reading material to go through and find exactly what you were just looking to get answered. now i know your new and want everything right away but 10 questions can be answered by reading a series of threads that multiple people have beeen going over in depth for years. alot of veteran members will veer off bothering with this topic as it has been beat to death. i am telling you how to navigate thru the site for info as i am the only knucklehead who has the patience to answer everyone and be of some help. there are new guys and some nice guys that are willing to share but the seasoned ones just blow these threads off cuz they get annoyed. the older threads about every aspect of bass fishing cover most all of what you have to ask. if you respond in those threads it immediately goes out to all who have contributed to it and therein the answers lie. sometimes being savvy can get you a whole lot more than just an answer to your question. it can give you network of people willing to help you along. so grasshopper, i say to you.... seek and ye shall find......:dizzy:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
amen zim. thanks for the info. and although i may be new to specifically targeting stripers i am an avid fisherman and if you are ever near the jersey shore shoot me a PM cause i see you are my new yoda haha jk but i'd love to come fish with you and learn from observing while helping you cover a beach or whatever it may be:funky:
 

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King of Eels
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both work extremely well,but during the worm hatch, large bass can become very selective while they sip the migrating wigglers off of the surface... a live lined worm on light line will out fish all other baits at this time...

bass, like most predators will key in on an abundant species.... all that said, if I can have only one bait, dead or alive, it would be an eel....
 

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i have hit one worm hatch (to your hundred) and it is all i wanna do to put a cinder worm fly into a hatch and go ''PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE" LMFAO! when do you see the first hatch up there>



 

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For me worms are a cold water bait 45 degrees and under,
clams to 50 degrees,
bunker, live and chunked to 55/60 degrees,
and eels and plugs over 55 degrees.

Thats just a very general rule of thumb that works in my area.
 

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Young salt
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Different baits for different times of the season newstriperfisher. Up in Old Orchard I use sandworms (never ever bloodworms, waste of money if ya ask me) early in the season then I switch over to live eels, herring/mackerel or clams as the season progresses. A stripers migration north begins off the coast of N.C. and Virginia where they chase schools of shad and herring. As water temperatures rise they move further north in search of colder water. While stripers will feed primarily opn these schools early in their migration, they also feed on sand/blood/sea worms. Worms prove to be most effective (for me anyway) early in the season but they lose interest in them as water temps rise. During the fall run, stripers will fatten themselves up for the winter, gorging on schools of baitfish (known as blitzes), clams and eels, but not so much on worms anymore.

As far as flinging worms off your hook, rig 'em up 2 at a time and you'll have no problem. Take the first one and stick the hook thru head (right between the pinchers) feeding the worm onto it an inch or two, then pushing the hook out thru the underside leaving the majority of it to dangle. Take your second worm and feed the hook into it's back (starting from roughly the same point the hook came out of your first one) coming out thru the head, once again right between the pinchers. This method has proven VERY effective for me here in Maine. Somethign about two worms dangling in unison in the surf makes them irresistable to passing stripers. You can use this set-up a couple different ways, but the two I use are:

1) Slide a sinker slide (I just use a barrel swivel) with a 5 or 6 oz. pyramid sinker onto your main line, then tie your main line onto one end of a barrel swivel and tie your leader off the other end. This will allow your line to pass thru the swivel when the fish hits but keep it from feeling the added tension from the weight........often times leading to the fish spitting your offering out!!

2) The second method is similiar only you attach your weight directly to the barrell swivel connecting your main line to your leader, then add a float a few inches from the hook to keep it off bottom. This method is particularly effective in rocky areas or where an abundance of crabs can be found. The only downfall is if the surf is too high or the undertow too strong, that weight will pick up every piece of seaweed in it's path and make for a hell of a mess (your line bogging down and having to recast every 10-15 minutes).

Hope some of this helped ya out, here's looking forawrd to bigger and better things this upcoming season.


StriperHyper ~ Will
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
will that's awesome advice. how is the striper fishing up there and when does it kick in because my friend goes to college up there and i'll be prob going up with him a little this year and i know lake fishing is good but never thought to surf it too

:thu:
 

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Young salt
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Fishing doesn't start heating up in OOB until the first week of June but I'm always out there by mid-May at the latest. Where does your buddy go to college up here, not in Biddeford by chance is it? Let me know a little in advance when your coming up man, I'd be happy to show ya around to a few places. 20 minutes any direction from my house there's a boat load of good fishing spots....some that are well known and others that aren't. Like I said drop me a pm with a little advanced notice so i can hook ya up....always happy to help out a fellow 247 member!!!!!

StriperHyper ~ Will
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
i would love that. he goes to university of southern maine. it should be some time this summer for a weekend and i'd be more than happy to go with you. can't wait :a_goodjob:
 
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