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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All I have know is a 10' surf rod.
I was at Indian River Inlet and saw some guy plugging with what looked like a 6' foot rod. Within 10 minutes he had a 30" striper.

Also what line and leader should I use? 30lb mono with a 50 lb leader?
 

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Try a 7 1/2 foot penn international inshore rod.
I got one and it is real great action.

Or try a Medium Heavy extra fast tapper tip okuma 7 foot spinning rod. thats good also. Its cheaper.

Also go with 20 lb powerpro. and if it is your first time casting with braid use a 25 lb mono leader. if not than just go with the braid.
 

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Striper Hunter
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10' surf rod should be fine. I use a 9' or 11' myself.

I prefer a heavier braid...at least 40 - 50 LB and I do not use powerpro. I use berkley or suffix. I use a 40 LB fluorocarbon leader of about 30" long. I use Ande or Seaguar.

You''ll get a wide variety of answers

My last 4 trips fishing from shore = 23 fish. 20 over keeper size including my personal best at 41" and 6 fish in the 20 LB class

Going for my 30 LB class or bigger tonight

Make sure your rod and reel can handle braided line
 

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Rubber Shad Ex-spert
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Welcome!

IMHO the Jetty already gets you into deep water, so long casts aren't the first concern.

You want a rod that you don't mind getting dropped on the rocks and scratched! Just me, but I would stay away from %100 graphite rods for rock hopping. Too fragile. Composite is better.

I'm thinking about a pure jetty / rock rod, and mine is going to be a heavy musky blank. somewhere around 7 to 8 feet. G-loomis makes great rods (you will pay $$ for it). Here is a link to some musky blanks

http://www.mudhole.com/Shop-Our-Catalog/GLoomis/Muskie-Walleye-Blanks

If you don't want to build your own, you can goto G-loomis website.

As for line, you truly can't beat braid. Furthermore, if you are going to go braid, AND build your own rod, you may want to look around online. Most spinning reel guys say that smaller stripper guides are way to go, like fuji lowrider.

Just my two cents. Happy fishing!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Try a 7 1/2 foot penn international inshore rod.
I got one and it is real great action.

Or try a Medium Heavy extra fast tapper tip okuma 7 foot spinning rod. thats good also. Its cheaper.

Also go with 20 lb powerpro. and if it is your first time casting with braid use a 25 lb mono leader. if not than just go with the braid.
Is there a certain product name?
http://www.okumafishing.com/category/50169/Rods

Also I was planning on using my 10 foot for tog fishing or for just casting out with a bottom rig while I plug

Lastly I checked out those blanks. I've never got a blank. I'm guessing its worth it. lol How hard is it to put the rod together? Or do I get someone to do that for me?

Thanks for the help guys!:a_goodjob:
 

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Rubber Shad Ex-spert
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Rod building is easy! I do suggest you do your homework ahead of time

1)find the spine
2)identify where you want the reel to be
3)put the tip guide on, and you may as well put one right behind it around 5.5"
4)put the reel seat on, and then start experimenting with guide placement.

5)the stripper guide for lack of better words, "tames" the coils of monofiliment as they come the spool. tape the guides on, and experiment.

Homework.
 

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will work for stripers
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All I have know is a 10' surf rod.
I was at Indian River Inlet and saw some guy plugging with what looked like a 6' foot rod. Within 10 minutes he had a 30" striper.

Also what line and leader should I use? 30lb mono with a 50 lb leader?
your 10 footer should be fine.....it wasnt the size of the rod that caught that fish.
 

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First Mate
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As said your 10' should be fine but I also have a St. Croix Premier 7'6" MH It's also my musky rod(as Dpolson said). It's actually a great rod. I usually will not use on a day when the wind is real strong as it's a conventional, I would then goto 10' and 704z(Fireline 20#) As said you usually don't need to cast real far as your already in the deep but casting farther covers more area. I have mine spooled with 30# Poewer Pro. And there is nothing wrong with the Power Pro if I thought there was I also have spools of Fireline and Suffix I can spool with. I use leaders anywhere from 30 to 60# of Seaguar, Yo- Zuri(best Fluoro I have), or Ande Mono at 30" to 50" long. I dont care for the Ande all that much, oh yeah I also have 30# Mono of Big Game and Momoi (best Mono)
 

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Rubber Shad Ex-spert
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As the guys have pointed out, you can fish the jetties with a 10' surf rod. Nobody can stop you! The only down side is that real eastate and footing tends to be at a premium, and the 10' rod can be cumbersome.

Much like yourself, I am presently down to one rod . . . a 10'6" surf rod. I used that on the rocks all the time because that's what I have. It's sort of akward and cumbersome on the rocks.

The upside of a stout musky rod say 7' to 8' is mobility and ease of use in tight spots, and most of them are rated for line up to 50# and lure weights up to 5oz or more. Light weight and compact for trecherous rocks.

Jerseystriper can tell you better about line than I can, but I must second Powerpro brand. It's always worked good for me. Put a mono backing on the spool, and then spool on the braid wet (i.e. put the whole package of braid in a bucket of water, make sure it's good and saturated)
 

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Suffix and Berkley are crap....used them both and they were pretty horrible. Been using power pro for a long time without issue.

Regarding the rod length, a short rod is only good for backbay use. I will never step foot on a jetty with anything less than 10' for the reasons listed below.

1. Short rods can't throw big stuff the max rating is probably 2oz, which is cool if you like throwing small stuff for schoolies.

2. Chances of breaking off a big fish are much greater without the extra leverage of a large rod, which in some cases is very helpful in jetty fishing as sometimes you risk your life to land your fish, also the extra leverage will keep the fish out of the rocks.

3. Light gear is really good at killing big bass, the mortality rate will go up on fish you fight for a long time, a big 35# and up bass will take a considerable amount of time to pull in on a small rig and if you don't turn him he might make a run that leaves you without line afterwards.

4. Casting performance-your distance will be much less with that short rod.

5. Versitility-If you have the money to own several rods tailored to each type of striper fishing you do then it doesn't really matter but if not then a 9-10ft rig will work well both in the back bay and off the jetty.

Just my .02 if all you catch is schoolies and fish backbays then it might be worthwhile to own something short like that, but remember those big fish do go in backbays and you wouldn't want to be caught off guard would you?
 

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First Mate
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I don't wan't to start a pissing contest here but I can't understand where you got this info from

Suffix and Berkley are crap....used them both and they were pretty horrible. Been using power pro for a long time without issue.

Regarding the rod length, a short rod is only good for backbay use. I will never step foot on a jetty with anything less than 10' for the reasons listed below.

1. Short rods can't throw big stuff the max rating is probably 2oz, which is cool if you like throwing small stuff for schoolies.

The rating on my 7'6" is upto 3 oz. and I have thrown over 4oz. with no problem what so ever. Have you ever seen musky plug/lures? They are as big as most very large Striper plugs. I do think he mentioned plugs, I could be wrong though. Pike and Musky eat big bait, I even seen video of a huge pike (40 or 50 some odd lbs)eating a 38" or so pike just before taking it out of the water at the boat. Rod also has plenty of back bone and power

2. Chances of breaking off a big fish are much greater without the extra leverage of a large rod, which in some cases is very helpful in jetty fishing as sometimes you risk your life to land your fish, also the extra leverage will keep the fish out of the rocks.

There is plenty of leverage with a Musky rod as you have a similar handle(long). I quess a Musky must be a small weak fish?????-Have you ever caught a 50+ inch Musky or N. Pike????

3. Light gear is really good at killing big bass, the mortality rate will go up on fish you fight for a long time, a big 35# and up bass will take a considerable amount of time to pull in on a small rig and if you don't turn him he might make a run that leaves you without line afterwards.

Thousands of people have used rods like this before and thousands more will in the future with no problem. My choice would be a 9' or 8' minimum like I had(but was stolen). I use the same reel as I would on a 10' plus rod so power and turning is no problem.

4. Casting performance-your distance will be much less with that short rod.

This is where the main differance is and I had mentioned this.

5. Versitility-If you have the money to own several rods tailored to each type of striper fishing you do then it doesn't really matter but if not then a 9-10ft rig will work well both in the back bay and off the jetty.

9' may be a bit big for the back bay or even from shore on the Hudson. 8' would be much more versitile as casting can be quite choked up with trees, reeds and such

Just my .02 if all you catch is schoolies and fish backbays then it might be worthwhile to own something short like that, but remember those big fish do go in backbays and you wouldn't want to be caught off guard would you?
This is small as a Musky goes which was caught from land not a boat and landed with no problem. I may have a striper pic or 2 that was caught with same rod.-99 out of a 100 times I don't have a camera when fishing. I'm also not saying that a Musky or N. pike is the same as a Striper but if this same type rod will take in a 58" Pike no problem along with several others over 50" then I'm convinced
 

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First Mate
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This is actually a very decent rod, may also be my next rod in 9'-maybe 10'. The rod has very good action, is nice and light, comes with lifetime warranty all for around $100. I have whipped around the 9' and 10' of these rods and liked both of them, they load up nice. You can buy a better rod but would be hard pressed to find a better one for around $100.

http://www.tackledirect.com/star-stellar-lite-surf-rods.html

Another 1/2 decent rod is a Ugly Stik Graphite Custom. It's nothing like the regular Uglies as it's graphite, nice and light and also around $100. The 10' spinning will also handle upto 5 oz lure weight and the 8'6" uptp 5 oz. This is just a link for some info on it. I know nothing about this company selling it, I just used the link to show some info and price. I have seen this rod a little bit cheaper locally. 5 yr warranty

http://www.jandh.com/p-890-shakespeare-ugly-stik-custom-graphite-surf-rods.aspx

There are also other great rods Tsunami, Tica and so on for arount the same $100 price range
 

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2. Chances of breaking off a big fish are much greater without the extra leverage of a large rod, which in some cases is very helpful in jetty fishing as sometimes you risk your life to land your fish, also the extra leverage will keep the fish out of the rocks.

4. Casting performance-your distance will be much less with that short rod.
I've always been told the longer rod gave leverage to the fish!

I've cast my sons shrek rod over 50 feet. I've also cast a 5 foot ugly stick I use for bait 100 ft with 8 lb test. Why would you need to cast more than this from a jetty when the fish are usualy right below you?
Reminds me of guys on peirs with 15+ft surf rods casting for china with fish right under the peir.
 

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I've cast my sons shrek rod over 50 feet. I've also cast a 5 foot ugly stick I use for bait 100 ft with 8 lb test. Why would you need to cast more than this from a jetty when the fish are usually right below you?
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In regards to the question of "Why would you need to cast more than this when the fish are usually right below you?" it has been my personal experience that when I am fishing from a jetty some fish are caught right next to the rocks but for the most part I want to get my bait or plug out as far as I can to reach schools of fish that are congregating on the outside of the current in the deep water hundreds of feet from the end of the jetty.
Just my 2 cents but i would highly recommend a longer pole so that it is possible to reach everything from fish right under the rocks to way far off the end. It would be a real pisser if you went out to the end and saw a huge blitz of a lifetime and you had a short rod and couldn't quite reach it, maybe be off by a crucial 10 yards or so?
 

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I'm not going to point anyone out in particular but there's some really bad information in this thread.

I've lived my entire life around jetty country in NJ, been fishing them since I was old enough to ride my bike there.
I've used everything from an 8' Abu rod with a Penn SS 4500 (a long time ago) to a an 11' 9" BreakAway LDFS 119-2 with a ZeeBass 27.

In my experience something in the middle is the best all around fit.

I've been badly schooled by a few larger fish with the 8' outfit and the 12' outfit is too much effort to fish for any amount of time.

Over the years I've narrowed it down to a few rods that I fish off the rocks regularly.

AFAW 11' Estuary - amazingly light and extremely powerful, can do anything from pencil popping to eeling. I use this 75% of the time.

Lami XS 101 MS, 10'. Great rod, takes a beating, does most everything well. To be honest since I got the Estuary I never use this one anymore.

Lami GSB 1321m - 11'. Long, heavy, too much work to plug with, but as a dedicated pencil and popper rod it's unbeatable. I use this during the spring run when we have 20# to 40# fish blitzing on bunker and I need a beast of a rod that can throw big lures very far and that can horse a cow in before some googan idiot in the mob throws over my line.

Lami XSRA 108-4 - 9', light and snappy, perfect for late season when 90% of the fish are schoolies. Has enough backbone to deal with a larger fish if it should come along.

There are a few others I use but they're not off the rack, some haven't been made in 25 years so I won't bother listing them in this thread.

As a sidenote, I don't have either (yet), but I've had the opportunity to test the new St Croix Mojo and the 10' Seeker Baby Uala and they would also make excellent choices.

If I could only have one rod, hands down it would be the AFAW Estuary :sydan:

AFWIW - PowerPro is trash, breaks at the mere whisper of the word barnacle. I went down that road long ago and refuse to ever touch the stuff again.
I mainly use 20# Fireline on my older reels (Penn 706's, Mitchell 496 and 396 PUM........) and 30# Suffix and 20# Stren Superbraid on my modern style reels. No problems at all.

And the #1 most important piece of gear for the jetty fisherman - KORKERS !! Do NOT go rock hopping without them, or some other, equally good, brand of spiked footwear.
 

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First Mate
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Sudsy Quote" As a sidenote, I don't have either (yet), but I've had the opportunity to test the new St Croix Mojo and the 10' Seeker Baby Uala and they would also make excellent choices."

How new was the Mojo? I had one 7'11" which my daughter broke off in my boat house door. My Abu 6600c was on it when I got. The reason why I ask how new is this is a bass rod as a large or small mouth unless they have a new model. Actually many of the mojos were technique specific. I almost bought another as Cabela's had a big discount on them in the spring but the model I wanted was either sold out or not on sale.

The reason for mentioning the Star and Ugly is they are around $100(with good warranties) rods as is the price for the Okumas. My choice rod for my Abu is a 9' plus not the 7'6" it's on now. (I had one but someone thought they deserved it more then me-stolen). The price comparison was the reason for not mentioning $200 plus rods, I don't think they have made the Lami XS 101 in years( I just remember looking it up in the spring)

"Is that musky eating a walleye. Lol." Actually the pike is eating another pike, stories on that fish come from many US states, Canada and Europe(I think it's either Rainy Lake or Holland though). They will do that often, they are crazy fish and even crazier in the winter. I have caught them through the ice and one still had a large tail sticking out of the back of it's throat(eaten a pretty large fish) but it was still eating. In the winter they will eat everything they can get. Many folks call them freshwater sharks and the fight is just plain awesome. If you ever get a chance to head to some of our central northern states or Canada to fish them then go, you will not be disappointed. Sorry to bring this up in a Striper forum, I had just wanted to use as a fighting comparison. I know many Stripers grow bigger but the Pike/Musky is no slouch
here is another one for your enjoyment
 

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I don't think they have made the Lami XS 101 in years( I just remember looking it up in the spring)
Incorrect. http://www.lamiglas.com/prod_indiv.php?groupid=25

I also must agree with Sudsy 100% on the AFAW Estuary. Incredible backbone in the lower 1/2 of the rod, yet it has a very sensitive tip perfect for plugging, working pencils, and eeling. It's light and tough with a sweet spot in the 2.5 to 2.75 oz range. My go-to rod 90% of the time. thumbsup.gif
 
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