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Animated Knots by Grog
The Snell Knot

First pass the tag end through the eye of the hook from the front of the hook. Only pass it through about half an inch.
Hold the shank of the hook and the half inch tag end and wrap the trace around both the shank of the hook and the tag end 7 or 8 turns.
Pass the trace back down through the eye of the hook from the back of the hook.
Pull the trace tight while holding the hook to set the snell.
There should be very little or no tag end protruding when the knot is set. Then pull tight you have a snelled hook that you can tie to a swivel with a uni knot.

You can also use a uniknot to snell a hook.

1) Thread six inches of line through the eye of the hook. 2) Hold the line against the hook's shank, and form a Uni-Knot circle.

3) Make five to seven turns through the loop and around the standing line and hook's shank.

4) Tighten by pulling the standing line in one direction and the tag end in the other.
 

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Palomar Knot

Palomar Knot is easy to tie, exceptionally strong and very popular with bass fishing pros for tying on jigs and worm hooks. It is somewhat awkward to tie when using lures with treble hooks, but it is the recommended knot for braided lines.


 

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The Uni Knot

The Uni Popular fishermans knot. Used for connecting hooks, swivels, rings and lures. Its main advantage is that it retains virtually 90% breaking strain. Easy to tie even in the the dark after some practice.
 

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Albright Knot

Albright Knot Animated Albright
This knot is used to join two lines of different thicknesses. It is used to attach a heavier 'leader' (rather than a double) to a lighter main line.
It requires careful forming of the loops. I use it to tie on a shockleader.

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Blood Knot

Blood Knot This is a high strength knot to join two similar thicknesses of line. It's main advantage is it's low profile enabling it to run smoothly through rod line guides.

 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Shockleader Knot

Shockleader knot to use when joining large diameter line to a thin diameter line. I find this one very easy and durable.

Step 1: Tie an overhand (Granny) knot in the heavy trace material and pass your lighter main line through.


Step 2: Pull the overhand knot in the heavy line tightly closed. Take four or five turns around the heavy line with the light.
Step 3: Pass the light line back through the first loop as shown. Lubricate with saliva and pull tight. Trim end to about 2mm.
Use a length of heavier nylon at the working end of your main line. The shock leader should be about 2 to 2 and half times the length of your rod. The weight of shock leader line should generally be two or three times the breaking strain of your main line.
We use what is called a "tapered" shock leader which is approximately 20 lb at one end (which attaches to the main line) and about 40 to 70 lb at the sinker end. This allows for smoother travel through the guides on your rod.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Turle Knot or snare knot

Turle Knot or snare knot. A very simple knot used to tie hooks to a light leader.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Wind on Wire leader

Wind on Wire Leader - A fairly simple join which enables reasonably long plastic coated wire traces to be wound up through the rod guides. Can be used for casting lures.

 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
http://www.noreast.com/discussion/ViewTopic.cfm?page=1&startrow=1&topic_ID=25971
I took the info from Noreast.com
Thanks Red
Thanks for the post
This is what Alberto wrote about that knot

"Since the inception of the super lines (about 10 years ago)? there was no real mono to braid knots. And those common knots everyone recommended just didnt cut it! Because we are in the high-tech age and introducing a new material to the equation (braid with special coatings / Fluorocarbon leaders / non stretch fibers), I actually tried many recommended knots (with frustrations) so I came up with this knot for myself and Ive been using ever since. I have a few friends (& some world record friends) who loves it and will not go back. In fact, it is being well received through out (from Mexico / Costa Rica / Florida and Canada) and I am glad everyone is enjoying it.

The key to my knot is simple. Make sure everything is "snug and tight". Once it is done correctly, You should not have any problems! Although I noticed that there are new lines coming out with added slippery coatings (to allow more distance) it may be a good idea to dab it with crazy glue. Personally, I tie straight without it but if it adds confidence do it."
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The Spider Hitch

The Spider Hitch


The spider hitch is second only to the Bimini Twist but is much faster and easier to tie. The drawback is that it needs to be perfectly tightened or it may cut itself. When pulling the knot closed, both loops need to be the same size. If they are not you can adjust the loop by either pulling the tag or standing line until they are both the same size and then you can close the knot. Keeping the knot wet is a must.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Blue. The loops can be made long enough to attach a hook directly to the loop. You can use the palomar to tie the hook to the loop.


A better method of forming a loop, or loops, in the line above the sinker is to use the old Dropper Loop. This draws into a knot that stands out at right angles to the line. If desired, the loops can be made long enough to have a hook set on them.

The Palomar Knot
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Important knot tying tips.
Monofilament
A critical factor in obtaining proper knot strength is to maintain tight and even pressure while tying the knot.
Your finished knot coils should be tight and neat looking. If you have any overlays or funny looking coils, cut the line and start over, as these will drasticaly rduce the knot strength.
One of the secrets of a well formed knot is moisture which lubricates and will properly set the wraps for a stronger knot.
To increase your knot strength by as much as 20%, use any lubricant spray, liquid or hand and lure cleaner, or fish attracting oil. Anything but saliva as research has shown that this will decrease knot strength because it is a digestive enzyme.
With heavy monofilament use a rag or a glove to grip the standing part of the line, hold the tag end on the hook with a pair of plyers. Use a lubricant on the knot and pull steady until the knot is drawn up tight. With real heavy line you will not be able to tighten the knot properly by hand.​

Superbraid
These super strong lines are three to four times stronger than monofilament of the same diameter. With less than 5% stretch [up to 30% with mono] sensitivity is drastically increased and you will be able to feel the instant a fish bites your lure or bait. Hook setting is virtually instantaneous even when jigging at greater depths.
Being much more abrasion resistent, they will last many times longer than mono. Most of the super braids float, absorb very little water and remain limp without any memory. Top water bass fishermen prefer them by a wide margin over mono. Fly fishermen like the fact that when they use super braid for backing they are able to keep the line out of the water while fighting fish.
The super braids are very slick and slip a lot more than mono and can knife down into the reel if not wound tightly onto the reel while spooling. Extensive testing by line manufacturers have shown an average of 25% loss of knot strenght. when tying knots with super braids it is of utmost importance that the wraps sit tightly together and your lines are not crossed. If they are notstart over.
Allow 4 or 5 more wraps than you normally would with mono When drawing up the knot use a rag or a glove to grip the standing part of the line, grip the tag end or hook with a pair of pliers and pull to set the knot. You will not be able to tighten the knot properly by hand. Leave tag ends at least a quarter inch long and use a sharp pair of scissors to trim tags. (fiskers work well)

From the Little red knot fishing book by Harry Nilsson
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Number of Wraps or Coils to use for each line strength with Mono Line

Up to 10 lbs test use 6 to 7 wraps
For Lines 12 to 18 lbs test use 5 to 6 wraps
For Lines 20 to 30 lbs test use 3 to 4 wraps
For Heavy lines 50 to 100 lbs test use 3 to 4 wraps.
Anything less can reult in a failed knot​

When tying a knot around a hook shank (snelled) always begin wrap away from the hook eye connection, so the sharp edge cannot cut the line during battle with a heavy fish

Do not trim your knots flush up against the wraps, as with all knots will to a greater or lesser degree slip slightly.
With light lines leave the tag length about 1/16"
With medium lines leave an 1/8"
With heavy lines leave about 1/4"​

After battling a heavy fish you will find the exposed tag about half the length you started with​
 
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