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Rubber Shad Ex-spert
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A buddy of mine said he fishes in the little estuaries of Maine in the summer. He says he waits for low tide, and that way the fish get squeezed into the smaller pokets of the river. It makes sense to me: less water means fewer places for bait and striper to go.

Does anybody fish like this at low tide? It's been my experience that striper can be taken at low tide, but most will advise against it. I'm beginning to think tide matters less than other conditions.
 

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Registered User
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D.
Several factors influence the way that predators use tide and current to its advantage. Tide matters a lot. As does current and a myriad of other factors.
Your buddy is on target with the area he hunts. But you would be wise to learn how to find spots that will produce on all tide stages and weather conditions. This can takes years of experience.
I would recommend zenos book 'the art of surfcasting'. He covers these in his book on the chapter on tides.
You can also find much of that info here on these pages if you systematically read the stickies in the striper room. + and this thread http://stripers247.com/phpBB2/showthread.php?t=7161
 

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King of Eels
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AH... but high tide allows then to visit places they normaly cant get into...thus opening a whole new buffet table...

I fish when I can, thus making use of the tide as to the location I plan to fish.... May cant get here soon enough!
 

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Veteran Striper Chaser
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Kinda like taking the bus uptown or down town.there ether feeding on the in coming and high or the outgoing and low. I guess on your river you like it without a lot of water,but donut forget the current with its rips
 

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Super Moderator
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I know where i fish when the tide is low the fish tend to travel the channell
when its high tide its like the light switch is turned on .but the bait is the same way when the tide is up the herring are easy to get .when the tide is out they are skiddish ''harder'' to catch but i fish in the upper hudson so maybe things are differant here ..i fish from shore to
 

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First Mate
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Like others have said it really depends on where your fishing. I got some spots that I only fish out going, some incoming and some any tide.
 

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In the Bay of Fundy at low tide you might be able to catch a crab or a seagull :lff3:, But if you find a river channel you might surprise yourself. I like 1 hour before and after high tide. Watch the moons and predicted tide levels. We like about 3 days before the max. this is when the fish seem to be most excited about exploring new territory. But the best rule of thumb is if your not there you can't catch em.
 

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I had a BLAST!
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There is a spot I fish that is productive as it turns from the top, and it is productive just before dead low. If there is bait around, the low tide spots will produce.
 

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I am gonna share something , i dont fish the exact tides. I have not used a high tide chart in 5 years . I fish the currents , the high slack table .. Time and water movement .... Try it you wont be disappointed .Has made my catch to skunk ratio alot higher .. I have places that will be 1 -2 3 hours before or after high low slack water .... it takes some time to get used to it but it rally works ... I will be the first one to say im am not the best fisherman or a good fisherman but nobody works harder .... Log books are so damn important

.....Plus if your serious and not a sometime Surf Rat then you will scout and log ...If the tides off or the wind is off then scout . When you scout you will have a spot for every wind and weather situation .

This sport of ours is difficult at best , its not a video game . I have spots shut down for a couple of nights for no reason , you can see them but no bite .............

I just wanted to share

MJ:salute::threadjacked:
 

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Well, lots of fisherman prefer low tide, especially those working from shore. When the tide is low you can learn the underwater structure and where the fish will hold at different stages of the flood/ebb cycle. Fish will move back in over the exposed structure on the flood, so you can work your way back to land, fishing the structure as it gets covered. Make sense?

This is especially true around estuaries, or beaches with a lot of rocks or sandbars. Steeper beeches fish better at the higher tides, at least that's what I've found to be true. In an estuary, move up away from the mouth more than two hours after the tide starts to flood.
 
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