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  #1  
Old 11-15-2005, 09:36 AM
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Default Mass cod and herring laws...update

The Mass Department of marine fisheries have approved two bill of importance:

Bill 32CMR8.15 Prohibits the fishing of codfish in Mass bay north of 42 20' and south of 42 30' from 12/1 to 1/15 this will be a two year seasonal closer..

Bill 322.CMR 6.17 is a complete 2 year moritorium of the harvest,possesion or sale of river herring in Mass state waters

More details can be found on Mass.gov/marine fisheries...

this should be a good thing, this will keep comercial interests off of spawning codfish in the inshore waters

with the sharp decline of river herring this bill will also be a good thing....
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  #2  
Old 11-15-2005, 12:28 PM
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You beat me to it Roc. I was just going to post these new regs in the other thread I started on cod regs. The new cod regs aren't as restrictive as was originally proposed...no change in limit or size for the recreational angler.

Remember when the primary reason given for the declining cod fishery was the abundance of seals? I think the current prevailing theory as to cod stocks declining is that they're starving. The reasoning.......Cod, unlike haddock which feed mostly on bottom dwelling creatures, typically feed mostly on small fish, which are no longer available in great abundance. Both cod and haddock are referred to as bottom fish I think mainly because both are typically found on or near bottom. However, their diets vary considerably. One just has to look at the position of their mouths to figure that out.

The critical evidence suggesting that they are indeed starving seems pretty conclusive to me. Looking at the typical cod caught 15 years ago versus today, several noteworthy differences can be seen. The same age fish is considerably smaller today than it was 15 years ago. Today, they got no belly and look emaciated. Here's something that's really interesting.....todays cod appear to be hunch-backed potentially indicating that they are changing their traditional diet from small fish to bottom dwelling creatures. Since a cods mouth position is not ideal for bottom feeding, they must bend their torso to feed while swimming. Studies of the belly contents of todays cod seem to confirm this.

I'm not sure how the new regs are speaking to the prevalent starvation theory unless it has something to do with the new herring restrictions. Any idea what they're trying to do with these new herring regs?

What's your take on this Roc?
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Old 11-15-2005, 03:48 PM
saltstrikerkid16 saltstrikerkid16 is offline
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so where exactly does that mean you cannot fish for cod?
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  #4  
Old 11-16-2005, 08:07 AM
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Well, I remember catching as many pot bellied cod from the Plum island beach in October,November and December as I could carry! Not any more...

You make an exellent point about fishes mouths, something my dad taught me many years ago, also the posistion of their eyes, it's all related to their survival habits and feeding tactics...

As you may or may not know i did extremly well in June with cod and Haddock on the inshore grounds,but I'll post a pic to help illistrate your point, the cod fish I am holding up is skinny, it should weigh about 20 lbs but would be lucky to be 15! Of coarse i did get two big bloaks that went between 60 and 70 lbs, unfortunatly the day was hot and i had no way to keep them cold once i left the boat, so I didnt weigh them, they both bottomed the 50lb scale with ease.

The lack of herring is a HUGE problem,an upswing in the dogfish and bluefish cycle has pushed the mackerel north early in the season, thus leaving little feed for Cod,stripers and tuna.

Years ago when I fished lake Winnipisauki, they stocked salmon every year, we rarely got anything over 2 lbs, then the NH fish and wild life reduced the number of salmon stocked and began protecting the smelt and stocking them as well, now Winni has a flourishing fishery, 4-5lb salmon and monster rainbows are common, the average size lake trout went fron 18" to about 4 lbs... Just a small example of what an abundant feed sorce can do for a fishery..

Haddock are bottom grubbers,I caught many,their bellies are always full of shells,gravel and various crusteacians...

I got all those haddock and cod in three hours alone,5 miles from the beach, hopefully the action taken by the NMF will help the continued sucess of the haddock and protect the cod to the point that we can continue to enjoy them in close from a small boat. That day alone gave me enough fish to eat fish twice a week from june until now,we still have a few packages left..BTW I own a vacume packer... it's the only way to go!
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Old 11-16-2005, 08:35 AM
jbrotz24 jbrotz24 is offline
 
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You also gave me some of that cod and haddock also to bring home and it was good. That vac seal is definately the way to go. We bought one and use it all the time. It saves alot of money and keeps things fresh for awhile.
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Old 11-16-2005, 09:13 AM
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I forgot that I had given you some, I gave some to alot of people, I had a 100 qt cooler full, it wouldnt hold another fish, I left them bitiing,fishing was awesome until the inshore dragger season opened July 1st, one week of comercial fishing and the only thing left was dogfish!
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Old 11-16-2005, 10:12 AM
jbrotz24 jbrotz24 is offline
 
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Hey if you have enough left and want to bring a little maybe we can cook it up before we go fishing Friday night. It worked last time lol. Always a good way to start the night.
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Old 11-17-2005, 07:51 AM
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Hey Roc, when you process cod do you attempt to remove the laval cyst (cod worm) or do you view it as extra protein? I've heard that some commercial proccessers use a light table (used for examining X-rays) to see the worm in the cods muscles and pick them out with tweezers.

The life cycle of cod worm is quite interesting. From what I've read these laval cysts are dormant in cod. When a seal (or other predator) eats the worm infested cod the lavae matures in the predators stomack and produces eggs which are release in the predators fecal matter. In the case of seals, this starts the cycle all over again. If JJ doesn't know about this perhaps I made a mistake by bringing this up. He may not want to eat the fish you bring down for Thanks Giving.

This kind of reminds me of an add I saw a long time ago posted on a college bulletin board. "Tape worm for sale. Easy to care for pet. Goes where you go and eats what you eat" :)

Found this interesting related article on my second favorate web site ;)

If you haven't checked out this site yet (I promoted in another thread), if you have time you should. It's got tons of great information.

Here's the article I was referring to above.

http://www.fisherycrisis.com/seals/sealsncod.htm
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Old 11-17-2005, 08:08 AM
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Tony,
The easiest way I have found to remove the worms is as follows:
before leaving the fishing sight,I get two buckets of sea water and snap a cover on them, once I begin filleting my fish i place each filllet in the briney water, aftter a short soak,I transfer the fittets into the "new" bucket of water, almost all blood,scales and worms will be free of the fillets, the fillets will also be much firmer and freeze better, another method is to filet the fish, rinse quickly at the dock, then once you arrive home cover the fillets in the cooler with cold water, add a cup of kosher salt and 5-10 lb of ice, soak the fillets for an hour, rinse under cold water. pick out any worms that have come to the surface,pat dry and freeze...

The NMFC approved a bill yesterday that would stop pair and mid water trawling for herring from P.town to rockland Maine, I dont have the particulars at this time but will post the update when I know more (unless Tony beats me to it)
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Old 11-17-2005, 08:27 AM
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Quote:
I dont have the particulars at this time but will post the update when I know more (unless Tony beats me to it)
It's good that you and I are beginning to co-ordinate our posts. It's all yours.

Tony
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Old 11-17-2005, 08:39 AM
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First I've heard of this. Do you find a lot of worms in the cod you catch?
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Old 11-17-2005, 08:54 AM
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Bait, lots of fish have parasitic worms. The number of worms can vary from none to many. Typically, cod taken from the same location have similar round worm counts, indicating the levels are determined by the surrounding environemt.

Here's most everything you might NOT want to know.

http://www.fao.org/wairdocs/tan/x5951e/x5951e01.htm
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Old 11-17-2005, 08:57 AM
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Tony,
It doesnt matter who posts the info...so long as someone does...
BTW, if you can get up to my way in June, I'll treat you to some of the best inshore cod and haddock fishing on the coast... ;)

Bait,

All fish can have parasitic worms, some are so microscopic you cant see them, Sword fish have huge"slugs" almost like a tape worm...

Cod and cusk are the bearers of the "worm" that Tony and I are talking about, they cannot reside in humans , some cod can be loaded wwith them others may have few if any, cusk are nortorious for being loaded with worms, I've had cusk (whiich are a pain to fillet anyway) so full of worms that I've chucked them overboard for the gull to eat...
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Old 11-17-2005, 09:40 AM
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Here's an exerpt from the above link to the article I referenced.

Are round worms dangerous?
There have been cases of human illness caused by the ingestion of live Phocanema or Anisakis larvae in countries where raw or lightly cured fish is commonly eaten. By 1980, there had been only one reported case of illness in the United Kingdom caused by larval round worms from fish; this is because in the UK fish products are normally cooked before consumption. Phocanema and Anisakis larvae are killed in 1 minute at a temperature of 60?C or over. In practice this means that cooking a fillet 3 cm thick for 10 minutes at 60?C will kill any worms present. The temperature of a cold smoking process, for example kippering, is not high enough to kill parasites, but in a commercial hot smoking process a high enough temperature is usually maintained for long enough to kill them. Freezing of fish at - 20?C for 60 hours kills all worms.

Anisakis larvae are resistant to salting; immersion in 80? brine, 21 per cent salt, for 10 days will kill all larvae, but in brine of lower strength they can survive for much longer. Anisakis is also resistant to marinating. When there is any doubt about whether Anisakis will survive a process it is safest to use frozen fish. The ability of Phocanema to withstand salting or marinating is not known, but it is probably similar to that of Anisakis.

Anybody want to do sushi for lunch?

By the way, most home freezers reach -16 to -22?C. In my lab we have freezers that are held at -40 and -70?C. We also have what's called "quick freezers". These are chambers which have tanks of liquid nitrogen attached. Nitrogen gas becomes liquid at tempertures between 65 and 77? kelvin....burrrrrrr....... I'm sure you've all seen the demonstration where the science nerd (lab boy) dips a flower into liquid nitrogen and then bangs it against the counter and it shatters. I dip my technicians hands in it. :)

Bait, one other thing I forgot to mention in my previous post was that the number of parasites are also tied to both size and age of the fish. The larger and older cod have more worms. Kind of intuitive if you know that the laval cyst, stage of life while in cod, is dormant and remains in the cod's tissue until the cod itself dies.
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Old 11-17-2005, 10:19 AM
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we use liquid nitrogen here as part of a process to leak check rocket thrusters and fuel nozzels, my first experience with it came when I was sevicing one of the big millers, I had just rebuilt the hydraulic pump and motor, one of the "lab boys" put some in a glass beaker and tossed the liqid from behind... I thought the whole thing was going up in smoke!


I'll still eat sushi, the first tuna I get every year gets a portion consumed on board! this stuff doesmnt bother me, I was a farmer as a child, if most people saw what i saw.... theyd go hungry!

Good info on the sqirmy things BTW!
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