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  #1  
Old 06-23-2009, 04:54 PM
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Default Lesson for a noob. . . . .

Reading thru these forums this season has compelled me to try and "bridge the gap" between the noob, the novice and the nut, the 3 basic kind of fisherman IMO. I write this not to seem like a know-it-all, 'cause I certainly do not, nor to look down on anyone, as I would not, cause it just ain't my game. We all laugh and joke here about anything from spot burning (anyone who's been here awhile knows is a VERY sore subject) to carrying a "googan white bucket" to hucking meat from the surf, or deadsticking as it's called. The point of this thread is to illustrate what I've learned from this site in the 2 seasons Ive been here, and maybe give hope to a noob who's frustrated to the point they are ready to throw in the towel and watch figure skating with their wives.


"Putting your time in" is so loosely referred to on this site, measured in incriments of hours or days spent on the water. It wasn't unil this year that I realized that hours, days and even months is but a fraction of the bigger picture. The incriment of "time," for the sake of this conversation, is measured on a much larger scale such as years, and for some, decades. It's easy to go to the beach/river/jetty with a cooler full of eels, a box of sandworms or a bag o' plugs, fish for a few hours and call it a night. If ya catch fish ya slam the boards the next day posting where ya caught said fish, at what time, tide, with what and who ya had with ya. If ya get skunked ya bitch and moan (like I did last season, BIG MISTAKE) and start asking for guys honey holes JUST so you can catch something to say ya caught something, maybe build up your confidence only to repeat the same practice once the bite slows down.

If this young season has taught me anything, it's that I've completely changed my gameplan when hunting for stripers. The first lesson I've learned is the ENORMOUS difference between "hunting" for stripers" and simply "going fishing," whether you're deadsticking, slinging eels or chucking plugs. Anyone can attach a string to a stick or a lure to a line one time and walk away with a fish, maybe even the fish of a lifetime that some of us only dream of. It's great to be in the right place at the right time, and all it takes is that one time to get ya hooked. For those who have been doing this for longer periods of time, much, much longer than myself even, these are the guys who go on the "hunt" and hence, put in their time.


Lesson #2 has taught me that "putting in time" doesn't mean going to the same spot on the beach/river/jetty night after night, cause you can only learn so much by doing so, no matter how many times ya do it. Nor does it mean switching up between a couple/few spots that are well known to the masses whether you're catching fish or getting skunked. Taking the extra time to explore, getting to the spots ya never thought possible and keeping an eye out, whether during fishing season or driving down a dead end rd in the thick of winter just to see where it leads and the potential it has for holding fish, all constitute putting in your time. It's about taking conditions into effect far beyond tide and time of day such as wind direction, structure (both in and out of the water), weather patterns, location of bait fish and why they are where they are at that particular time, just to name a few. It's fishing @ ur honey hole for hours only to get skunked, then moving on to the next spot, determined by what's going on around you. It's being in a bait/tackle shop and assisting a guy whos taking his kid out for the first time, spending however long explainging what to use, how to use it and most importantly, why to use it.


I've been fishing for stripers since I was knee high to a grasshopper, but only recently picked it back up when I moved to OOB. Having the ocean as my back yard has afforded me the opportunity to fish as often as I want, for however long I want. It wasn't until this season that I started putting all of this together, like a big puzzle, and realizing that there's soooo much more to learn. There is always gonna be a better spot that holds more/bigger fish. It's finding that spot and knowing that not many others would bother/dare to go there that makes it worthwhile (hence the uprising about people who burn them). So if ya just started fishing in May of this year, the next time ya catch yourself saying "I went out for 3 hours today," and ya still wonder why ya get no love for saying ya put your time in, I hope this clears it up a little bit. Thanks for listening, hope this helps someone become a better angler going forward. God knows this site and all the knowledge Ive gathered from various old salts has helped me improve my game more than I ever thought possible.



StriperHyper ~ Will
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  #2  
Old 06-23-2009, 05:19 PM
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Mark P Mark P is offline
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Default Re: Lesson for a noob. . . . .

Great Post Will. It is a humbling Sport we all enjoy. Just when you think you have a clue you realize how much more there is to know.
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  #3  
Old 06-23-2009, 05:29 PM
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Ghilie Ghilie is offline
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Default Re: Lesson for a noob. . . . .

Will you really hit on some big points there. I have yet to put in any "time" as compared to those great striper fisherman. But last year i put in countless trips to multiple beaches, trying multiple different baits at different tides at different times of the day. And what did i get for that? I got a few 20in stripers on the last trip of the year, and boy did it feel GOOD. That officially got me hocked on striper fishing, which lead me to this website this year where i have taken what seems to be a lifetime of information in only a few weeks time. Yet, being only 16 years old, i realize there is SOOO much more to discover in this great sport of striper fishing. Great post again will.
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  #4  
Old 06-24-2009, 08:19 AM
Triggah Triggah is offline
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Default Re: Lesson for a noob. . . . .

Wow...that was a well put together statement. This would be my first official post on this site...been watching and reading for some time now and finally feel like its time to introduce myself. I must say that i've been fairly frustrated so far this season and your statement Will has provided me some fresh excitement for this weekend's hunt. I'm a Mainah and fish out of Casco Bay and have been doing so for the last 4 years...all of my fishing is done from my boat. Anyway....just wanted to say Hey and thanks to Will for the motivating post.
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  #5  
Old 06-24-2009, 10:07 AM
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Default Re: Lesson for a noob. . . . .

Triggah,


Hyper,

Often the best part of "getting", is the journey. Remember to enjoy the trip.
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  #6  
Old 06-24-2009, 11:29 AM
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Doublerunner Doublerunner is offline
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Default Re: Lesson for a noob. . . . .

Will, great post my friend.

Gary, wise words. I coached youth soccer for 20 years and just retired from it. The words I always used for my players but even more especially for the parents was to "enjoy the journey".

If you enjoy all the other things that come with fishing such as making new friends or being out alone on a calm night under the stars. Or learning new things about fishing, or shore areas, or your boating areas or about yourself then it makes catching fish all that more rewarding and not catching them not as important
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  #7  
Old 06-24-2009, 11:43 AM
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jon006 jon006 is offline
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Default Re: Lesson for a noob. . . . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by FLOATSUM View Post
Triggah,


Hyper,

Often the best part of "getting", is the journey. Remember to enjoy the trip.
Nice post Will and good point Float. The trip has got to be the best part; especially when you realize where you started to where you've ended up. Remembering all the mileage, skunkings, nights the waves scared the crap out of you, nights that you're to tired to remember, and best of all the people you meet along the way!
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  #8  
Old 06-24-2009, 05:37 PM
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FLOATSUM FLOATSUM is offline
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Default Re: Lesson for a noob. . . . .

Thanks.
There is soo much to the journey that only gets thought of when you look where you've been.
Rod building/design, plug building, making molds for tins, reel repair and modifying, learning bait patterns, learning the effects of a storm both before and after, relating the jet & gulf streams to your fishing spots, sharing with a stranger's 9 yr. old kid that sees the ocean for the first time when from somewhere like Colorado... and gets his first "almost keeper", sharing a brew with a new friend after a long blitz, finally finding out what it is that moves bait fish the way they move, finally figureing out that fish actually do eat 24 / 7 somewhere - and figuring out where.
Realizing that a surf man can learn from a flyfisher and boat folks alike.
,,, and finally coming to the conclusion that actually catching a fish is not the best part of fishing after all.
It truely is the journey.
...And that my friend is what I truely love about the sport of fishing.
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  #9  
Old 06-24-2009, 10:39 PM
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zimno1 zimno1 is offline
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Default Re: Lesson for a noob. . . . .

nope.
there are them that are so obsessed about a fish that it consumes them.
they are tunnell vision fishermen.
they will not see the ten spot on the ground.
they will not see the osprey diving for the bluefish
they will not see the rainbow in the sky for fear of missing a swirl
they will not feel or smell the ocean breeze and curse the wind in the wrong direction.
they will fail to notice and avoid the obvious and ignore the novice.
they will not feature rest and contemplation
they will only tunnell thru the surf with one track mind.
i see them and i know them.
i understand them
i just don't get them.
i was one of them.
it will take some time to find oneself.
if for any other reason i fish with a flyrod to find a moment of relaxation and pleasure of fishing.
you'll never be bored catching multiple fish
but you will eventually want more out ot the experience trust me..
be cognisant of what the sport really is all about and not "i gotta get a fish or i'll just die"
lifes too short to sweat the small fish..
and when you've fished as many years they are all small as you aspire to see a bigger one than your personal best or in some cases worst.



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  #10  
Old 06-25-2009, 01:29 PM
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StriperHyper StriperHyper is offline
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Default Re: Lesson for a noob. . . . .

I forgot to mention this in my original post, but what I meant was, I'm at the VERY beginning stages of moving on from novice to whatever the hell the next step is. I've found myself going places I'd never have gone last year, fishing for many, many more hours per outing and at several different spots, both easy and seemingly impossible to get to. Staring straight into a 30-40 mph wind off the south side of the jetty @ Hills beach but, instead of giving up, using it to my advantage (trying to hunker down in a cove around the corner and cast WITH the wind, not into it). I figured that the fish weren't coming up the Saco River due to the rain compromising the brackish water and hence, weren't holding under the dam like they usually do. My thought was with the tide coming in and the heavy wind in my face that if there were fish around like there usually are, that they'd be forced right in front of me (to no avail, but it was the thought that counted). I nkow there's still a lifetime of lessons to learn, including surfplugology, fishing on the fly and mastering Biddeford Pool, to name a few, but Ive been pleased with my new approach thus far.....and rewarded with the 2nd biggest fish of my life, just under 30" and roughly 14 lbs (I know, small to most of ya but it was quite the thrill for me). I feel as though I have some of the tools now to put myself on larger fish, and that I will before the season is through. Biggest thing Ive learned though is WHY I'm doing some of the things Im doing. Why I'm going to certain places and then moving on to the next in any given night. I look forward to the remainder of this year, learning a LOT more and hopefully being rewarded with bigger and better fish.



StriperHyper ~ Will
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  #11  
Old 07-01-2009, 09:08 PM
farm627 farm627 is offline
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Default Re: Lesson for a noob. . . . .

Hi guys ,just reading the post and i can see how to catch the biggest srtiper of ur life can consume you i have been there, and after many of the biggest fish YET i still thrill to the thought of the 50 pounder ,will i catch him i doubt it but as i have time off to fish i will shurly try!!! went to a spot last night (always thought of it as my spot) from shore was a kid there forgot his name he said he was there a few times previous year and had some sucsess. bout 18-19yrs old, grew up in town bla bla bla. told me when he was a kid his mom walked him through this SPOT saw a guy pull in a nice fish , he looked at the water and saw a difference lol u guys following me? there are many people who fish here this kid has the upper hand HE HAS MY SPOT, funny thing is i never learn i showed a kid MY WHITE PAIL TODAY in 5 yrs its his SPOT, funny how life is hope ur spot is as productive as mine and i hope u beilive u can catch fish any where because when u learn the tricks u will no spot nessasary!!!
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  #12  
Old 07-01-2009, 09:11 PM
farm627 farm627 is offline
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Default Re: Lesson for a noob. . . . .

please dont get me wrong i still dont understand this googan thing ?
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  #13  
Old 07-01-2009, 09:31 PM
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Default Re: Lesson for a noob. . . . .

A googan is a person who doesn't have much of a clue but is willing to learn - we were all googans at some point.

A Hammerhead is a googan who doesn't want to learn, they think they know it all already. Those are the guys that are mugging you, casting over your line, and then getting belligerent when you tell them to get the hell away from you.

And as for the topic of the thread, the more you know the more you realize you don't know. I often think I'm a complete idiot when it comes to this damned sport.
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  #14  
Old 07-01-2009, 10:04 PM
farm627 farm627 is offline
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Default Re: Lesson for a noob. . . . .

so as i ruled my own spot as i hunt the Eastern seaboard for the 1 , why wouldnt u want people to fish where there are fish, nobodys realy following the true spot seems a bit (stuck up to say the least) to think u have the spots ! we all have our spots and just up the beach the kid brings another larger fish. luck is the ruler of all fishing if u dont believe u will surly be sour lol
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  #15  
Old 07-01-2009, 10:08 PM
farm627 farm627 is offline
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Default Re: Lesson for a noob. . . . .

i as a 17 yr old sat at bridge 1 nite and the pollock were in , i mean big pollock,15 lbs 3 of us fished in a row the middle guy got 1 the other 2 of us got a bushel, he was between us same bait same hhok, just touch baby lol
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