Paint For Bullet Weights - Stripers247.com Forums
 
Striped Bass Fishing Site Map | Contact Us | Fishing Log Software | Fishing Online | Advertise
to UPLOAD: please register or login

Go Back   Stripers247.com Forums > Equipment & Tackle --- How To / Do It Yourself Forums > Plugs and Plug Building
Forgot Password? Register Now!!

Plugs and Plug Building This is our lure and plug building forum.


Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 06-20-2006, 12:24 PM
PMSKnives PMSKnives is offline
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 28
Default Paint For Bullet Weights

Do any of you paint your bullet type weights to match the color of the rubber worms that you use? If so, what kind and where would I be able to obtain some?

Thanks
Mark
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2  
Old 06-20-2006, 04:07 PM
TonyDB TonyDB is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,058
Default

When mass produced commercially, most manufacturers use what's called an epoxy powder coating. What this is a pigmented solid epoxy that's been micronised. The basic process is to heat the weight to between 300-350?F and quickly dip it into the powder coating rotating it provide a uniform reasonably thick coating. Epoxies are some of the hardest most abrassive resistant polymers around.

This can be done by a do-it-yourselfer with the proper equipment.

However, most do-it-yourselfers will opt for a paint-it-on process. If this is your intent, I would not recommend a liquid epoxy. Your thinkness will be too thin and because most over-the-shelf epoxies are formulated to be rigid, the coating will flake off with abuse.

For paint-on coatings I'd suggest a vinyl or urethane based paint. These polymers are more flexible and will conform when you ding the weight.

I have no experience in using either of these approaches for this application and my recommendations are based on my status as a Glue-ru.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-20-2006, 04:10 PM
Roccus's Avatar
Roccus Roccus is offline
King of Eels
Pro Staff
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Reading, Mass/Rings Island
Posts: 4,227
Default

I powder paint all my jigs,jusat heat them with a torch and dip themin the poweder, shake off excess, if you want a real tough coating, bake them in a 350 oven for 15 minutes...

Craft stores sell it as well asStamina baits and others
__________________
.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #4  
Old 06-20-2006, 04:21 PM
TonyDB TonyDB is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,058
Default

Yes Roc, but you're not the typical do-it-yourselfer.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-20-2006, 05:04 PM
Sudsy's Avatar
Sudsy Sudsy is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: On the Hook, NJ
Posts: 3,471
Default

Score yourself a used toaster oven, build a hanging rack to fit inside out of sheet metal and some threaded rod and do the powder paint thing. Completely idiot proof.
__________________
"I just wanta play everyday despite small nagging injuries --
and go home to a woman who appreciates how full of crap I truly am"..... Crash Davis
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-21-2006, 07:37 AM
ckphelps's Avatar
ckphelps ckphelps is offline
Veteran Elite
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: WINCHENDON MA
Posts: 912
Default

there is a spray on powder coat that cures itself,one of the body shops I deal with uses it for custom work.you will need a small paint gun,airbrush is too fine.I'll try to get the name of the stuff.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-21-2006, 09:02 AM
TonyDB TonyDB is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,058
Default

ASKING ELMER

Roc, Suds, I'd be interested in what the directions say on those powder coatings. Even better would be what's listed under composition on the MSDS. Roc, you mentioned that a bake/cure of 15 minutes at 350?F toughens the coating. This indicates to me that there is a curing agent in the product you use. After you remove it from the oven cure (15 minutes at 350F) and before it cools any, is the coating hard?

Many years ago, I formulated a product line of similar materials called preforms. Like powder coatings these were based on solid epoxy resins containing pigments, fillers, and curing agents. They were made by heating the solid resin above it's melt-point temperature (to become liquid) at which point we would mix in the other ingredients to meet the application requirements. Upon cooling, the formulated material would revert back to a solid. Then we would micronize it and press it into various configurations to make this preform/pill. The customer would simply take this preform, place in on his part, and place it into an oven to reflow the preform and eventually cross-like to a cured state.

Just a little polymer lesson.....plastics are divided into two categories, thermosetts and thermoplastics. A thermoplastic is a polymer that does not cross-link to a "cured" state. They are solid at room temperature and melt to a liquid at some elevated temp. This type of material will continue to go through this transition (solid at RT - liquid at elevated temp - and again solid at RT) no mater how many times you raise or lower the temp. The reason they are solid at RT is simply do to their very high molecular weight.

Thermosetts, on the other hand, contain a curing agent. So when they're heated (above the melting point of the curing agent), a reaction occurs creating a cross-linked network. This cross-linked network is perminent....the resulting material will remain a solid no matter how high you take it in temperature.

One thing Roc, I'm a little surprised that a 15 minute bake at 350F will complete the cure. My guess is that if indeed the product you use is a thermosett, it uses a curative called dicyanamide, one of the more commom curatives used in epoxy powder coatings. Because you have to heat the solid epoxy resin (to about 212F) to make it liquid in order to incorporate the other ingredients, the curative employed must be stable, unreactive at this temperature. So usually accelerators for dicy can not be used with this chemistry. Dicy BY ITSELF, is quite sluggish to cure at 350F without the use of these accelerators and 15 minutes at 350F is not enough to complete the cure.

CK, if I understand you correctly, that spray on material could be an epoxy powder coat type material dissolved in a solvent. When you say "cures itself", do you mean upon placing it in an oven or at room temperature? The basic difference is that cures at RT means that it's a thermoplastic and cures with heat means it's a thermosett.

CK, while the chemistry may be the same, the product may not adhere as well as a true powder coating. Why...I'm glad you asked....No bonding surface is completely smooth. Even the best machined part has microscopic nooks and crannies on its surface. By heating the surface before powder coating, you are expanding the air in these nooks and crannies. So when the dipped part begins to cool, the coating material gets sucked into these nooks and crannies (air contracts when cooling) providing more surface coverage and hence better adhesion.

There will be a test on this stuff at the end of the week.


Got a polymer question......just ask Elmer

Yeah I know...way too much info....I'm a What can I say.[/b]
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-21-2006, 09:46 AM
Sudsy's Avatar
Sudsy Sudsy is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: On the Hook, NJ
Posts: 3,471
Default

I use this stuff:

http://www.csipaint.com/powderpaint.htm
__________________
"I just wanta play everyday despite small nagging injuries --
and go home to a woman who appreciates how full of crap I truly am"..... Crash Davis
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 06-21-2006, 10:03 AM
TonyDB TonyDB is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,058
Default

Thanks Suds, apparently that product does cross-link to a thermosett with just 15 minutes at 350F and if you don't expose it, it remains a thermoplastic, at least until it sees those temperatures/times at some other point.

Must have an accelerator in it or uses another curative in place of dicy. Too bad they don't have a MSDS for the product on their web page.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 06-21-2006, 10:34 AM
PMSKnives PMSKnives is offline
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 28
Default

Thanks guys....

I have bookmarked all of the sites...

Since I am a hobby blacksmith/knifemaker, I do have an oven that I use for tempering baldes. So this will double as a lure/weight dying oven!!

Thanks Again
Mark

Custom Knives
by
Mark Pesetsky
http://www.pmsknives.com/
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 06-21-2006, 10:52 AM
Roccus's Avatar
Roccus Roccus is offline
King of Eels
Pro Staff
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Reading, Mass/Rings Island
Posts: 4,227
Default

Tony,
cant think of the brand off the top of my head, the oven bake isn't even needed, just heat the lead head with a torch dip in the powder and shake off the excess, the stuff cools to rock hard even without the bake, I knocked over about a hundred that were on a clothes drying rack, pre-bake, they all crashed to the cement, no more than a half dozen chipped, it's oderless and faster and more durable than any sprayed on enamel finish...and as Sudsy said idiot proof.....you cant screw it up....
__________________
.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 06-21-2006, 11:05 AM
TonyDB TonyDB is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,058
Default

Yeah Roc, I would think that even in it's thermoplastic state, the coating has enough integrity to do the job. Just on't hit it with a solvent like acetone, it will disolve. If you cross-link it with the 15 minute exposure to 350F, it won't.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 06-21-2006, 11:44 AM
ckphelps's Avatar
ckphelps ckphelps is offline
Veteran Elite
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: WINCHENDON MA
Posts: 912
Default

TRY THIS PLACE,ITS USED TO PAINT BRAKE CALIPERS,AND HEATS ITSELF,SPRAY GUN AND MASK REQUIRED.

http://www.autobarn.net/brakcallaqse.html
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 06-21-2006, 12:27 PM
TonyDB TonyDB is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,058
Default

CK, just to clarify, 1-part epoxies that become hard at RT after applying do not cure...they dry. These are solvent of water based products that become hard simply through evaporation of this volitile carrier. So all 1-part RT hardening epoxies are thermoplastics. You can accelerate the volatilazation with exposure to mild heat....but they don't cure. For epoxies to cure at RT, they need to be 2-part, one side is the resin the other the hardener.

Moisture cure urethanes (like hard-wood floor coatings) and cyanoacrylates (like crazy glue) are 1-part materials that will cure at room temperature. They suck moisture from the substrate or from the air which react with these polymers to create a thermosett material. Anerobic and UV acrylate adhesives are also 1-part polymers that will cure at RT, the former in the absence of oxegen, the later through free-radical homopolymerization with exposure to a specific range of light/wavelength.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 06-21-2006, 12:47 PM
JakeF's Avatar
JakeF JakeF is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: New Bedford, MA
Posts: 5,895
Default





Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
bullet, paint, weights

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
plastic worms & bullet weights for sale. jigfish Buy - Sell - Trade 0 03-30-2016 02:22 PM
Did I Get Screwed? fishstick Boaters Forum 33 05-26-2010 10:24 PM
New paint station... Roccus Plugs and Plug Building 12 02-22-2008 08:47 PM
Bottom Paint & Gel Coat captcal Boat repair issues & Shop Maintenance 2 04-02-2007 02:33 PM
removing boat paint? lewroo27 Boat repair issues & Shop Maintenance 3 05-31-2006 01:35 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:24 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2021 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2004 - 2013 Stripers247.com LLC
Affiliated Sites:   Noreast.com   Allcoast.com    2coolfishing.com