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  #1  
Old 09-14-2005, 06:20 PM
seabea12 seabea12 is offline
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Default How to Protect Your Boat and Motor from Old Man Winter

I am in newburyport, and did not have a good experiance with who winteized my boat last year. I would appreciate it if some one could recommend a good place that will come to the marina and winterize.
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  #2  
Old 09-14-2005, 06:25 PM
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JakeF JakeF is offline
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Hi Seabea12!!

Sorry I can't help you with your question,, but I'm sure that Roccus probably has some good recommendations.
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  #3  
Old 09-15-2005, 02:52 PM
seabea12 seabea12 is offline
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Default winterizing

Were can I get in touch with ROCCUS
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  #4  
Old 09-15-2005, 04:41 PM
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Seabea12,

PM me with the name of the person/dealer that did the job.... There are some good ones in the area , you just might have caught them on a bad day.....

What do you have for a rig???? I plan on putting up a "do it youreself" winterizing post in this forum in the next week or two...

Roc
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Old 09-15-2005, 07:14 PM
saltstrikerkid16 saltstrikerkid16 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roccus
Seabea12,

PM me with the name of the person/dealer that did the job.... There are some good ones in the area , you just might have caught them on a bad day.....

What do you have for a rig???? I plan on putting up a "do it youreself" winterizing post in this forum in the next week or two...

Roc
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Old 09-17-2005, 12:57 PM
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sea sea rider sea sea rider is offline
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What kind of motor or engine.
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  #7  
Old 09-24-2005, 03:54 PM
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Sorry I can't help out with this either.
Suggestion:
Move further south and you can use it all year like we do.
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  #8  
Old 10-29-2005, 07:31 AM
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Default How to Protect Your Boat and Motor from Old Man Winter

How to Protect Your Boat and Motor from Old Man Winter
By Brett Becker

...Seems like yesterday you pulled the cover off your boat in preparation for the summer boating season. If you needed a case of Lysol to remove the nauseating mildew smell and spent the first few outings adjusting this and fixing that, it's probably because you neglected your post-season maintenance last year. If you want to avoid that same scene next year, it makes sense to winterize your boat properly.
Cleaning Up Your Act
...It's probably best to begin by cleaning the boat. Wash the boat. You can use a marine concentrate or dishwashing soap. Be aware that dishwashing soap is strong enough to remove grease and oil from pots and pans, so it also will remove any wax on the gel-coat. It also should be enough to remove most stains. For those that don't wash right off, use a mild abrasive cleanser such as Soft Scrub without bleach. Scratches and cracks need to be fixed before storing the boat. Water can collect in these fissures, freeze and really screw things up.
...After you've cleaned and repaired the gel-coat, apply a quality wax to protect the finish. Though it looks smooth and seamless, gel-coat is porous, so dirt can penetrate the surface. Any dirt left over the winter will be more difficult to remove in the spring and can create a dull finish.
Now jump inside and take everything out. Yes, everything. Life vests and other gear can trap moisture in compartments and lockers. Besides not being good for the equipment, this moisture fosters mildew growth and creates that smell that nearly knocked you over early this summer. Remove canvas tops, lube the snaps and zippers, and store them unrolled. Be careful what lubricant you use. Some products, such as WD-40, can stain canvas. Chap Stick works well for lubricating snaps and doesn't stain.
...Now that the boat is empty, clean the upholstery. The same dish soap and warm water mixture you used to wash the boat will clean the upholstery. Remove the cushions and clean the underside. Wrap the end of a yardstick with a wash rag and secure it with a rubber band. Use this to get into all the tight seams and crevices where crumbs and creeping gunga always seem to lurk. Like gel-coat, vinyl is porous, so you should apply some dressing. Almost done inside.
...Carpeting can take a beating over the summer. Spilled soda, potato chip crumbs and mayonnaise fall to the floor where the sun bakes them to perfection, leaving you a real mess at season's end. A wet/dry vacuum will pick up dirt and crumbs, but you'll have to use carpet cleaner to remove the stains. Resolve household carpet cleaner cleans nearly anything and leaves a film that resists stains later. If you have a fiberglass cockpit stained with fish blood, believe it or not, Biz detergent is about the most effective cleaner.
Gearhead 101
...Now it's time to get your hands dirty. If you aren't the mechanical type, stop reading and take your boat to a dealership or marina, and have them take care of the details. If you are reasonably handy, you can get it done in a day, using common hand tools.
Lubrication Systems
...Before you do any work, change the engine oil and filter and the gear lube in the stern-drive/lower unit. If your gear lube looks milky, odds are a seal is faulty and allowing water to seep into the gear case. Replace any leaky seals. Run the engine first to warm the oil so it drains quickly and completely. Later, when you run the engine to flush the cooling system, fresh oil will coat internal parts. You will still have to change it next spring, because once oil is exposed to the byproducts of combustion, acids begin to form, which breaks it down, even when the engine isn't run for several months.
Cooling Systems
...If temperatures in your area dip below freezing, your cooling system needs to be void of any water and must be drained prior to storage. Outboard owners have it relatively easy. Trim and store the engine down fully and the water will drain out on its own.
"They are self-draining provided they are in the operation position," says Bud Stoudt, product support specialist for Mercury Marine.
Before moving on, let's jump over to fuel-system maintenance for a second. Before you run the engine three to five minutes at no more than 2,500 rpm to flush the cooling system, add some fuel stabilizer to the tank. That way, you can flush the cooling system and circulate treated fuel into the engine. Be careful: Most stabilizers, such as Stabil, only require drops to the gallon. Follow directions carefully.
It's also a good time to inspect the water pump. Check the impeller's condition. If it looks OK, grease the drive-shaft splines and reassemble. If it's worn beyond tolerance, replace it now.
...The flushing process for inboards and inboard/outboards is a little more labor intensive. After you flush the system with clean, fresh water, drain the drive unit by trimming it down fully. To drain the engine completely, remove drain plugs from the block, exhaust manifolds and oil coolers. This applies to inboards and I/Os. Plug locations are outlined in your owner's manual. Apply a little anti-seize lubricant to the threads and replace the plugs.
Belts, Hoses, Cables and Connections
...Remove all belts and lay them flat for storage. Check them for frays and cracks and replace as needed. And here's something a lot of people don't think about: Belts rub the paint off pulley grooves. During the winter, that bare metal can rust and cause pits that can chew up a belt. Spray the bare metal with WD-40 to deter rust. Remember to wipe off the pulleys in the spring to prevent slipping.
Like belts, rubber hoses can fatigue and crack with age and use. Check all of them for lumps, cracking and evidence of leakage. Check clamps, engine fittings and gaskets for signs of leaks.
...Now grab the WD-40 and spray all throttle and gear cables, shift levers, outboard and stern-drive pivot points. Also shoot exposed electrical connections and remove any electronic equipment to be stored indoors.
Battery
...Clean the terminals with a wire brush and lightly coat them with grease or WD-40 to deter corrosion. If you store your boat in the water, leave the battery in so the bilge pump runs. If you dry-store it, remove the battery. Batteries discharge if not used periodically. If it has removable caps, check the water level. Top off any low cells with distilled water. Don't use tap water because the minerals decrease battery life. There should be a line on the outside of the battery that indicates the proper level. If not, be sure the water covers the lead plates. Store it in a ventilated area and check the water level and state of charge periodically.
Fuel Systems
...Fuel system maintenance is probably the most crucial because if it's not performed, it can give you the most trouble down the road, er, river. You've already added fuel stabilizer, so let's move on.
How much fuel should you leave in the tank? It depends on what kind of tank you have. If it's steel, fill it so rust can't accumulate over the winter months. If it's stainless steel, aluminum or plastic, run it as low as possible and dispose of the remaining fuel safely.
For proper storage you have to "fog" the engine, which means coating the cylinders and combustion chambers with oil to prevent rust formation. On a carbureted two-stroke outboard, you can use fogging spray, available at most marine dealers. When you're flushing the cooling system (which, if you recall, is circulating the fuel stabilizer and fresh engine oil), shoot fogging spray down each carburetor venturi. Spray a lot. When the engine quits, that's enough. Then remove the spark plugs and put about a teaspoon of two-stroke oil in each cylinder and turn over the engine by hand. Do not crank the engine with the starter, because without water in the cooling system, you can damage the water-pump impeller.
...On fuel-injected two-stroke outboard engines, the venturis are more difficult to access, but you still have to coat the cylinders and combustion chambers. Remove the spark plugs and shoot 1 ounce of two-stroke oil into each cylinder and roll the engine over by hand. Basting syringes available from a cooking supply store work well for this. Follow the same procedure for inboards and I/Os, but instead of two-stroke oil, use automatic transmission fluid or Marvel Mystery Oil.
...Prepping fuel systems on carbureted inboard and I/O engines is tricky. Always replace the fuel filter at season's end. But even with fuel stabilizer, you can have trouble."With extended storage, of course the fuel in the float bowl evaporates," says Carl Seyerle, engineering director for Indmar Engines. "Floats drop to the bottom of the bowl and they get stuck there," he adds.
...Moisture can condense inside float bowls and can corrode and clog internal passages. Use the basting syringe and draw the fuel from the bowls by sticking the needle through the bowl vent tube(s). Fuel-injected inboards and I/Os are a snap. You do nothing but change the fuel filter.
..."On an EFI system, there is no evaporation. The fuel is sealed," Seyerle says. "You will get some separation over time because it's a mixture, but you've got a combustible mixture the first time you key up."
Wrap It Up
...Store the boat with all compartments open. Be sure to use a cover that repels water, yet allows the interior to breathe. Support the cover well with poles or battens and secure it tightly to prevent pooling of water, ice and snow. It's also a good idea to buy a dehumidifier/mildew inhibitor available from marine dealers. If you store your boat on land, be sure to pull the drain plug. Another popular and extremely effective option for covering and protecting a boat during the winter season is shrink-wrapping. Complete, cost-effective shrink-wrapping systems are available for covering boats up to 60 feet in length. Such systems offer a number of advantages, including a high level of protection against the damaging effects of weather and water. In most cases, shrink-wrap is also easy to apply, can be ventilated to eliminate moisture and mildew problems, and will not chafe or damage your boat
...While it often takes two days or so to perform all this maintenance, it's better to do it in the fall when you aren't hankering to get out on the water, says Mercury's Stoudt. "It's certainly easier to fix them in the off-season when the dealer has the time," Stoudt says, "rather than wait through the backlog in the summer."
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  #9  
Old 10-29-2005, 03:11 PM
rogerstg rogerstg is offline
 
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Good information but I'll make a few points points.

>>Lubrication Systems
...Before you do any work, change the engine oil and filter and the gear lube in the stern-drive/lower unit. If your gear lube looks milky, odds are a seal is faulty and allowing water to seep into the gear case. Replace any leaky seals. Run the engine first to warm the oil so it drains quickly and completely. Later, when you run the engine to flush the cooling system, fresh oil will coat internal parts. You will still have to change it next spring, because once oil is exposed to the byproducts of combustion, acids begin to form, which breaks it down, even when the engine isn't run for several months.
<<

Change the oil in an outboard as a last step instead of first so that you do not need to do it again in the spring.

>>Outboard owners have it relatively easy. Trim and store the engine down fully and the water will drain out on its own. "They are self-draining provided they are in the operation position," says Bud Stoudt, product support specialist for Mercury Marine.
Before moving on, let's jump over to fuel-system maintenance for a second. Before you run the engine three to five minutes at no more than 2,500 rpm to flush the cooling system, add some fuel stabilizer to the tank. That way, you can flush the cooling system and circulate treated fuel into the engine.
<<

3-5 minutes is not where nearly long enough to run to get the stabilizer through the system, especially if it has a racor type filter. Nor is it long enough to flush a system that presumably has not been flushed all year (otherwise it would have been done the last time the boat was used.)

To mix the stabilizer in the tank I put it in the tank the day before. Also, to avoid a long run, I disconnect the fuel line to the motor and siphon a gallon or so into another container. This brings the mix up to the motor.

>>Check the impeller's condition. If it looks OK, grease the drive-shaft splines and reassemble. If it's worn beyond tolerance, replace it now.<<

If you are going to go through the trouble of taking the lower unit off, you might as well change the impeller. You cannot tell from visual inspection if the rubber is becoming brittle.

>>Fuel-injected inboards and I/Os are a snap. You do nothing but change the fuel filter.
..."On an EFI system, there is no evaporation. The fuel is sealed," Seyerle says. "You will get some separation over time because it's a mixture, but you've got a combustible mixture the first time you key up."
<<

Some EFIs need to have the evaporators drained of gas for storage. Consult your manual.
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  #10  
Old 11-09-2005, 09:26 AM
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Roccus Roccus is offline
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I'll add just a little more, I put my Stabilizer in when I know the seasons coming to an end,usualy on what seems to be the last rip,that insures it will be through the system, I advise my custokmers to do it as well....

I agree whole heartedly that if your going to drop the lower unit to "check" the water pump.... just replace it, but, to maximize the life of the pump, change it in the spring.... water pumps (especialy the old style Merc) tend to take a set.. it's not a big deal, just maximizes the pump....
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