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  #1  
Old 08-26-2008, 05:34 PM
GunnySniper GunnySniper is offline
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Default The Rubba revolution

Before I start posting pictures, I thought I'd give a little history lesson. History from my point of view.
I started fishing rubber worms a long long time ago, and Mr Tom Mann made the one I loved. The ole Mann's Jelly worm kinda revolutionized Large Mouth Bass fishing for a lot of people. Correct me if I'm wrong, even though you can't here, but I believe he was the first to add scent. I bought all of them in every size he made. My favorite by far was the grape however. I caught more large Bass on that one color that I bought them by the bags of 100. That was the days before Texas, or Carolina rigging, and I used a weedless hook that had a thin wire loop wrapped on the shank that hooked on the tip of the barb. You could work that rig right through the lilly pads and really get to where the Bass were. One day I miscast and cranked the worm back in as fast as I could, I'll never forget watching the wake that followed after the boil under the pads I missed. That wake rocketed at that worm and hit it with so much force I thought somerone released a Striper into that pond. I found a new way to retrieve a rubber worm when a slow presentation didn't get a hit. Then one day I overshot a cast into an overhanging limb on the bank. As I started to get a slow swing going to the worm, like I had done with so many plugs before, so that I could time the pull to get the worm to come out and over the branch, a large Bass exploded out of the water and hammered the worm. The stick trick was born. Another time I was fishing some thick pads and overshot the hole in the middle of them. I slowly retrieved the worm across the top of the patch. Several very small openings between the worm and the large opening had to be crossed first. As the worm crossed one of them and slightly dipped into it as it climbed the next pad a nice bucket mouth crushed it with an airborn rocketing hit. I came to relize that there was no wrong way to work a worm. The experimentation never ended, and I found numerous other methods of being successfull with rubba.
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  #2  
Old 09-08-2008, 07:09 PM
GunnySniper GunnySniper is offline
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Default Re: The Rubba revolution

As the future of fresh water rubber worms evolved, they also started to add action into the moulded shape. Mister twisters became the hot new choice in the tackle shops. It wasn't long before every manufacturer started to mimic the curled tail. Salt water anglers also started to take notice and it was not long before some of the sharpies started putting them onto the shanks of bucktail jigs and found a new secret weapon.
I remember standing at the edge of a cove on a lake in maine and watched as a small baby snake made its way across the surface of the flat calm of the early morning. I will never forget the smallmouth Bass that exploded on that baby snake. I went to the shore, rigged a Mann's curly tail 7 inch blackberry worm and cast it to the opposite bank. I held my tip high and kept the worm on the surface, and just as I hoped it looked just like a snake swimming. The Bass was still hungry and when I finally landed it I had my personal best 6 plus pound smallie in hand.
Needless to say, I started to experiment in the salt water with them as well. At first it was all schoolies and chuckles from the old timers when they saw me head to the shore line with a "Fresh Water" rubber worm on my line.
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Old 09-10-2008, 09:36 PM
GunnySniper GunnySniper is offline
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Default Re: The Rubba revolution

Salt water fisherman, Stripermen in particular, can be stubborn to change. The rubba revolution had completely taken hold in the fresh water, before salts started to catch on to it. Many reasons are kicked around, such as the big money involved with the Large Mouth Bass tourneys, and endorsement monies generated by putting your name on stuff.
It eventually trickled in, and the initial offerings really kinda sucked. Some of the early stuff was actually quite good, and still hangs tough today.
The Femlee Eel was one of those products. Early versions were more of a sand Eel imitator, size wise, and were more often used ahead of a plug dropped as a teaser. Many a dark night, I caught more fish on that 6 inch rubber Eel than I did on the plug that chased it. Occasionally a double up would really get the blood boiling. My preference was to use a large metal lipped swimmer, usually black, with a fairly slow retrieve with a few tip slams that made the tail of the plug slap the surface. Sort of making it look like a strike attempt on the Eel. With the tip held high at 11:00 the Eel would usually be right at or just below the surface almost as if flaring.
I may be wrong, but my memory serves that Femlee was the first salt water rubber to add the wedged tail that effects a swimming action to the lure, now copied by almost 80% of all the molded rubber imitations on the market today.
For the most part, at first, jigs were the preferred method of using rubber. Large mister twister type "grub" tails with the signature curl were threaded onto the shaft of bucktails and bounced off the bottom allowing the tail to give its well known swimming appearance. In some cases they caught as many Fluke as they did Bass.
As these early presentations grew in popularity, manufacturers and the Dr. Frankensteins among us began to experiment with other types of imitations. Fresh water success stories were also put on steroids and offered to the salt water community, now willingly spending their money on lures, that in some cases, last as long as live bait.
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