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Sweetwater Fishing -Freshwater Stripers Freshwater fishing discussion. Articles on tactics and techniques for freshwater stripers as well as Bass & other species.


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  #1  
Old 03-01-2011, 02:39 AM
King-of-Oneil King-of-Oneil is offline
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Default For shore fishing anglers

I notice there are more boaters in this forum than there are off-shore anglers.

For all you off-shore anglers, this is the thread to discuss all your angling techniques.

From my experience, most boaters cannot give solid tips on how to fish off the bank.

If you have any questions regarding fishing from the banks, I will be more than happy to assist you any way I can.
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  #2  
Old 03-01-2011, 01:21 PM
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brzman brzman is offline
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Default Re: For off-shore anglers

Will Stripers head up small rivers and tidal marshes & tributaries ?

what type of plug/swimmer ?

thanks
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  #3  
Old 03-01-2011, 05:46 PM
King-of-Oneil King-of-Oneil is offline
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Default Re: For off-shore anglers

Quote:
Originally Posted by brzman View Post
Will Stripers head up small rivers and tidal marshes & tributaries ?

what type of plug/swimmer ?

thanks
It does not really matter what type of plugs you use. The most important aspects regarding gear when fishing for stripers are the following:

1. Depth - Stripers will hit top water lures and any other lures capable of a 3 feet dive during the Fall to early Winter - when fishing at night and early morning. In the day time, you'll need bottom lures such as swim baits, flukes etc..

2. Having the right color lure helps a lot - it promotes a better bite and furthermore when you feel you have the right color, you have more confidence in your cast. I personally prefer a green with orange belly plug when I know the season is hot as in striper season. I personally find stripers are very aggressive and they hardly discriminate against colors.

3. For early Spring, top water lures and 3-5 feet divers should still work fairly well during the evenings and early mornings.

4. In the Winter and Summer months, the tendency for stripers to bite near the surface is rather rare or should I say inconsistent. During these times, stripers are more prone to biting near the bottom - and you will increase your chances by using swim baits, flukes or anything which will trigger a bite near the bottom. But ultimately, it is the temperature of the water which determines the behavior of stripers and many other fishes. The climate for your area may differ extremely from my area here in Central California.

As for stripers heading up stream - Stripers like running water and will always go up stream for more or better oxygen. However the best times to fish running water is in the Fall to early Winter and early Spring. But as a rule of thumb, any time there is running water, a pump is turned on, or if their are wakes - then you should have a decent chance to land a striper.

I am guessing you are fishing for stripers in their natural habitats - so I'll tell you this: Stipers spawn in 65 degree water temperature and in running or flowing water. Spawning season usually starts around April thru early Summer.

If you have more specific questions, I will be more than happy to answer them.

King of Oneil aka KO
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  #4  
Old 03-01-2011, 07:02 PM
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brzman brzman is offline
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Default Re: For off-shore anglers

Thanks KO.

alot of good info there for me to go with.
I am fishing in Long Island Sound and yes Stripers are my main objective.
I live on a Tidal marsh (small river) that ebbs and flows into L.I. Sound and it is only a depth of 3'-6', low & high, would Stripers head into water this shallow ?
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  #5  
Old 03-01-2011, 07:39 PM
King-of-Oneil King-of-Oneil is offline
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Default Re: For off-shore anglers

Quote:
Originally Posted by brzman View Post
Thanks KO.

alot of good info there for me to go with.
I am fishing in Long Island Sound and yes Stripers are my main objective.
I live on a Tidal marsh (small river) that ebbs and flows into L.I. Sound and it is only a depth of 3'-6', low & high, would Stripers head into water this shallow ?

A maximum of six feet is very shallow and I will go ahead and tell you to not waste your time in those shallow waters. This is not to say you won't ever catch a striper in those shallow waters, but your chances would be slim.

When stripers are out and about foraging the waters at night, they do tend to hunt along the banks, so it is possible they may go into 6 feet waters - but as a long time striper fisherman, I personally would not waste my efforts.

I fish a quater-mile of the Oneill Forbay which connects to the California Aqueducts. This area is very much like a stream. When the water level is high, striper fishing is so easy. But when the water level is low, you seldom see people catch any fish.

Stripers are hunters. They like to roam about freely. In consistent six feet of water, I would imagine they would feel boxed in.

The best banks to fish are the ones connected to a large body of water where depths can exceed 15 feet or more. If a river is ten feet or more in depth, then it is very adequate for stripers.

Hope that helps,

KO
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  #6  
Old 03-01-2011, 07:51 PM
King-of-Oneil King-of-Oneil is offline
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Default Re: For off-shore anglers

One more thing I forgot to mention. Stripers do like to hunt alongside the banks but they are also very fearful of breaching the surface. Like all fishes, they feel vulnerable when breaching the surface. That is why I told you that fishing the banks is only good if it gets deeper.

Stripers will not consistently stay alongside the banks to hunt for food. They will constantly move in and out from the banks as they feed or hunt. (in the shallows to hunt and feed and into the deeper zones for safety) In consistent six feet of water, they cannot do that.
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  #7  
Old 03-01-2011, 10:47 PM
Steeler99 Steeler99 is offline
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Default Re: For off-shore anglers

Thanks for all of the posts, your insight is wonderful. I'm just learning to fish for stripers after years of largemouth bass fishing...trying to apply the same techniques in what I feel is extraordinarily deep water, and of course, this "pond" I'm fishing now has limiteless boundaries and depth.

If you were to fish new and uncharted waters, how would you approach the search? I'm in RI and I'm trying to learn what to fish and when...and I figure that in this scenerio, you'd be in the same boat as I am so to speak. I'm trying to learn the times of year that the fish are where, and how to locate the fish without hearing "search for rock and structure". We all know to find structure and moving water. But I'm not sure that the fish don't migrate being that the water temperature drops so much here. I'm very interested in hearing your advice on where and how to start my search for stripers.
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  #8  
Old 03-02-2011, 03:31 AM
King-of-Oneil King-of-Oneil is offline
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Default Re: For off-shore anglers

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steeler99 View Post
this "pond" I'm fishing now has limiteless boundaries and depth.

If you were to fish new and uncharted waters, how would you approach the search? I'm in RI and I'm trying to learn what to fish and when...and I figure that in this scenerio, you'd be in the same boat as I am so to speak. I'm trying to learn the times of year that the fish are where, and how to locate the fish without hearing "search for rock and structure". We all know to find structure and moving water. But I'm not sure that the fish don't migrate being that the water temperature drops so much here. I'm very interested in hearing your advice on where and how to start my search for stripers.
If it is an enclosed pond, then it is not a habitat for stripers - unless water is being fed from elsewhere such as a river, tributary and or reservior. For the sake of answering your question, I will assume this pond has stripers.

But first, I'll answer your question regarding all fresh water fishes relating to this pond. Spring and Summer time is the best time for bass (not stripers) Fishing for bass off the bank is quiet easy. From my experience, bass claim territories in shallow waters (let's say 10 feet plus or minus 5 feet)

When fishing for bass, I would hit all spots that seem shallow, spots which has cover, spots which you could see that has brushes or trees. When I fish for bass, I seldom use top water lures. I mostly go with divers or when all else fails, I resort to the sinko worms. The important thing here is: In order to be an effective bass fisherman, you need to have the gears for all depths.

For your smaller fishes like bluegills and crappies, you should have no problem catching these guys in the Spring and Summer time. When you catch one, you are going to catch a whole lot more.

Regarding stripers in this pond:
I would hit all the spots which seem to have a steep or steeper drop off. If there is a rocky region in this pond, that would be my first place to fish for stripers. Prey fish or smaller fishes like to hide in these rocky places and stripers will almost always visit these places when they are out and about foraging for food.

The best times for striper fishing is in the Fall to early Winter. During this time, they are trying to fatten themselves for the coming Winter. Also during this time, they are most active and will forage the banks more often than any other times during the year.


Stripers do not stay in one place. They are hunters and will constantly move throughout the pond, lake or reservoir during the biting seasons.

Keep in mind, the climate for my area is different from yours. You live in a generally colder region than I do. ( I am just guessing here- Fall for me is probably late Summer for you. The actual Fall you experience will probably be much colder than the Fall I experience)

The tips I have given you are all temperature and climate related. When I say Fall or Autumn, I mean average lows of 40 degrees and highs of 70 degrees of air temperatures.

That is all the time I have for tonight. I will answer more or give more fishing tips tomorrow or when I have the time. One thing you have not asked me is, "What to use for bait?"

As a rookie striper fisherman, I was misled to believe in some tactics and certain baits. Please tell me what you are using and how you are fishing?
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  #9  
Old 03-02-2011, 07:48 AM
Steeler99 Steeler99 is offline
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Default Re: For off-shore anglers

Sorry King, I think you misunderstood my pond comment...the "pond" I"m fishing is the Atlantic Ocean...hence the limiteless boundaries and depths. The bay I'm fishing is huge, and has water depths of 150 feet or more in places. I"m used to fishing a much different area, much smaller and shallower, and I almost feel overwhelmed when I get out in the boat.

I was asking how you'd approach coming to a new area such as where I am....and what you'd be looking for. I did the typical thing at first, fishing bridge piers, points, drop offs...there's one place I know here where the water is over a 100 feet deep less than 50 feet from shore. I have yet to catch fish there, or even see any on the fishfinder....which suprised me to say the least.

I haven't asked about bait because I typically use lures when I fish...and I'm somewhat "set in my ways" so to speak and I feel that my freshwater success will translate to stripers...once I understand them that is.

Basically I've yet to catch anything but blues....but last summer I wasn't focused on fishing so much. I went out, fished, and did my best....but I spent more time prospecting and learning to navigate using my gps/fishfinder. Plus, I had to wait for the newness of the boat to wear off, and now I should be able to have more alone time on the water. I've found that dragging kids behind the boat in a tube isn't condusive for catching stripers. haha
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  #10  
Old 03-02-2011, 05:56 PM
King-of-Oneil King-of-Oneil is offline
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Default Re: For off-shore anglers

LOL I guess I totally screwed your joke.

As far as putting myself in your shoes and fishing new and uncharted waters, I would use what I know about fresh water fishing and translate that into salt water fishing. I have only gone salt water fishing once when a few friends and I charted a boat. I will give you my opinions but honestly I should not be giving advice about salt water fishing.

The following is what I would do:

I would hit spots with structure of course.
With the fish finder, I am sure it is easy to identify schools when it detects them. I would find out what the season is for the different types of fishes you want to fish. Basically, in a nutshell, I know nothing.

From my experience as a fresh water angler, every lake or reservoir has at least one hot spot. You can either find this hot spot by fishing the frontier for a couple of years or you can talk to fellow anglers. I am sure your local tackle store would have folks who may be able to point you to the right direction.

The beauty of being an off-shore angler is you can approach fellow anglers and share stories and so called secrets. It is rather difficult to do that in the vast oceans.

I'm sorry I couldn't be much help. Rely on your instincts. You are a successful fresh water angler - it should not be too difficult to fish the oceans. There will be new tricks to learn but that will come to you - I'm sure.

Regarding salt water fishing, google should have some of those answers for you. I could have googled it and pass it on as my own knowledge but I am a man of integrity.

Good Luck, Steeler

King of Oneil
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  #11  
Old 03-03-2011, 05:10 PM
Steeler99 Steeler99 is offline
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Default Re: For off-shore anglers

Well, I appreciate your honesty...I assumed you were fishing tidal waters out in CA. I often forget that you can find stripers in fresh water being that I've never lived anwhere that had them, only the hybrids (not nearly as big).

I'm fishing a very, very large bay...or couple of bays I should say. I do go out in the ocean, but as I said, that's limited due to my set up and my boat isn't the most comfortable in huge waves.

I've found huge schools of fish at times, I mean, huge...but couldn't get into them for whatever reason. But I have done well, especially considering I'm pretty much learning on my own.

There's really only one bait shop here, and being I'm in a tourist area, I don't really trust what they say in there being that they don't know me. I don't shop in there enough to get to know them being that they're so overpriced it almost makes me nauseous.

I'm hoping to learn to focus on specific species of fish this summer, rather than generally scoping the area and generically fishing for whatever I catch. Learning about striper habits is something on my list, as well as learning to fish for fluke (my favorite to eat). A tuna or shark trip would be awesome, but I won't go at that alone. So basically, I'm here trying to learn as much as I can
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  #12  
Old 03-04-2011, 04:49 PM
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Striperjim Striperjim is offline
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Default Re: For shore fishing anglers

edit =sj
Re: For off-shore anglers
title change to shore fishing anglers .
less confusion

thread moved to surf bay and inlets.
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  #13  
Old 03-05-2011, 03:31 AM
King-of-Oneil King-of-Oneil is offline
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Default Re: For off-shore anglers

I am an off-shore fresh water angler for many years now.

Stripers in my area come from the California aqueducts which pumps water straight from the Pacific Pond. The Oneill Forbay, which I have fished for nearly a decade now, is being fed directly from the aqueducts.

I can tell you pretty much anything you want to know regarding fresh water striper fishing, but when it comes to salt water, I am perhaps more clueless than you are.
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Old 03-05-2011, 03:34 AM
King-of-Oneil King-of-Oneil is offline
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Default Re: For off-shore anglers

Off topic - Most experience fishermen will tell you the best bait to use is an actual live bait. But I'm telling you, from my experience which you may agree with because you fish with lures yourself, lures are the best. And the reason being is: You cannot fish a live bait like you would a lure. I find it ironic - from one experienced fisherman to another - fishermen would tell the each other live baits work best, but seldom do you see an experienced fishermen using live bait(s).

That last part was my rant which I needed to get out of the way.

Yes, I said it. Lures work better than live baits especially when you have only one line in the water.
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  #15  
Old 03-05-2011, 11:08 AM
Steeler99 Steeler99 is offline
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Default Re: For shore fishing anglers

well, I can't say that I entirely agree with you regarding lures vs. live bait. In fact, in certain species, I've caught far more fish using live bait than I ever did with lures (walleyes, sauger, perch). And with others, I catch far more on lures (trout & largemouth bass).

I use lures to canvass an area, to locate fish. Once I find them, I may switch to live bait...it depends on many variables, time of day, time of year, what i'm fishing for, and who's with me. I don't want 3 kids in the boat casting lures all over the place.

Having said that, in shore freshwater fishing for stripers can be much different than saltwater fishing for them. I've found that the fish migration patterns are difficult to follow in salt water...the fish I catch in RI today very well could have been in connecticut yesterday. With rivers, fish become isolated to specific areas and I feel it's easier to locate fish. Tides greatly influence the fishing...and it's often difficult to tell which direction the water is moving. This past summer, I had numerous days where water/waves seemed to be flowing north...but the boat actually drifted south. Even something as simple as the tide or water direction can be difficult to follow
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