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  #1  
Old 12-26-2006, 01:00 PM
wisey111 wisey111 is offline
 
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Default Equipment/tackle assistance please.

I just received a Redington Red Fly 9wt rod and an Orvis mid-arbor V reel for Christmas. I'd like to get people's opinions about this combo as I'm new to fly fishing and want to make sure I'm using the best thing for a beginner. Also any line or terminal tackle recommendations would also be appreciated.
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  #2  
Old 12-26-2006, 01:36 PM
Striper777 Striper777 is offline
 
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Default Re: Equipment/tackle assistance please.

That looks like it would be a good combo for a beginner.. As for line it depends on what you would plan on using it for..
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  #3  
Old 12-26-2006, 03:40 PM
Soulrebel Soulrebel is offline
 
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Default Re: Equipment/tackle assistance please.

I have seen a $25 rod cast a heavy fly 100 feet and I have seen a Sage XP throw line in pile 15 feet in front of the angler. The difference is in the person making the cast. Spending time learning how to cast BEFORE you go fishing will help tremendously. I often have clients learn the casting stroke before I put a rod in their hands. Most people learning don't relize the importance of the backcast. The folks a flyanglersonline.com have info, but I recomend a book by Lefty Kreh. GOOD Luck

Dating and fishing should be approached the same way:
Catch & Release
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  #4  
Old 12-26-2006, 06:15 PM
wisey111 wisey111 is offline
 
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Default Re: Equipment/tackle assistance please.

Thank you for the responses. I'd be using it for striper, inshore, rivers, inlets and maybe a bit in the surf. If necessary I'll get another spool & line set up. If you have any suggestions for fly line and backing types that would be great.

I will likely take a lesson at some point late winter early spring to lear to cast correctly. I had someone showing me a bit on their set up early this year so I know there is a bit to learning the timing and correct form.
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  #5  
Old 12-28-2006, 10:08 AM
RBreslin RBreslin is offline
 
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Default Re: Equipment/tackle assistance please.

You will certainly like that reel. I haven't had much experience with Reddington fly rods. I do have a casting rod made by them that I really like for the money it cost. The one Reddington fly rod I casted I didn't like, because it was too slow for me. Its hard to tell what rod one person will like over another, because we all have different strengths and casting styles. Some really great fly casters may not like my rods due to speed. As far as quality goes, I think Reddington makes a fairly quality product, not the best, but certainly not the worst. I would say you would be fine with a rod of that quality if you are just starting out. The reel should last you a very long time if you take care of it. As far as line goes, I was a cortland fan for years, they came out with the 555 and I immediately got a hold of two spools of it and threw it on my spools. I fished it for half a year, and it is back in the boxes in my basement. Worse line I have ever used at any price point, my 555 floating is actually delaminating after only minimal use. Now I mix between Cortlands 444 which I still love, and lately I have been buying RIO products that I really like. As far as backing goes, 20 lb dacron is fine. any of the gel-spun or smaller diameter stuff is just a waste, that reel will hold 150 yards of backing. If there is anyone here that has gotten 150 yards in to their backing fighting a striper I would be amazed. I certainly have not. Not even half of that. I actually bought a MA IV last year to put on my 9wt and the salesman told me it was too small for stripers, I asked him how much backing the IV holds, he said only 125 yards. I asked if he has ever had a striper in to more then 25 yards of backing. then I mentioned where I normally fish for stripers and that if they got 200 yards of line and backing out on me they would be about 25 yards up on land on the opposite shore line. He laughed and then questioned why they ever sell a V to striper guys.
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  #6  
Old 12-28-2006, 08:01 PM
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zimno1 zimno1 is offline
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Default Re: Equipment/tackle assistance please.

you will want a good line! in the surf you may wanna read this thoroughly. Match the length of the fly line's head to your casting ability.
Weight-forward fly lines are designed such that, to make your longest cast, you are intended to get the entire head section (that is, the entire weight-forward section of line, from the tip of the line to the end of the rear taper) just outside the rod tip, and then, after you stop the rod on the final forward cast, release the running line that is trapped in your line hand. The force of the unrolling cast will pull a number of yards of the thin running line with it, allowing you to deliver a fly a significant distance.
If any portion of the head section (which is thicker and heavier than running line) is still inside the rod tip when you stop the rod on the final forward cast, this will, to some degree, impede your cast if you attempt to shoot line on the delivery.
Choosing a line whose head section stays within the parameters of your casting ability will allow you to fulfill your distance potential. Never choose a fly line whose head length exceeds the amount of line you can comfortably hold outside the rod tip while false casting. If you're among the vast majority of fly-fishers, this will be somewhere between 35 and 45 feet of fly line. This number is too important to speculate. To determine the maximum head length for your casting ability, line your rod either with a long-belly taper (any weight-forward floating line whose head section is 40 feet or longer will do), or even a double taper line matched to your rod's line-weight designation. Then, beginning with about 30 feet of line outside the rod tip, simply false cast. Make a few false casts and see how it feels. If you feel you can handle more line in the air comfortably, strip off another foot of line and make a few false casts with that. Repeat this process, not until your cast collapses completely or until your line starts ticking the ground, but just until you feel you've reached the limits of your comfort zone. Next, measure how much fly line you have outside the rod tip. If you were able to hold 38 feet of line outside the rod tip comfortably, but felt that any more may have been pushing it, you should choose a line whose maximum head length is slightly less than 38 feet.
This is not to suggest that a line with an even shorter head may not be a good choice as well; in the hands of a good caster, and depending upon its intended use, it would. What's critical is that a caster who can hold only 38 feet of line in the air comfortably should never choose a fly line whose head length exceeds 38 feet.
Most fly lines marketed under names that imply the line was made specifically to cast distance have very long head sections, usually exceeding 50 feet. To hold 50 feet of fly line in the air comfortably requires exceptional casting ability. The number of casters I know personally who can actually do this--comfortably--I can count on one hand. The vast majority of fly-fishers will perform much better with a head section that is shorter than 50 feet--one they can hold outside the rod tip before making their delivery. A good caster can deliver a fly 80 or more feet using a fly line whose head section is less than 40 feet long. FOR A SINGLE-HANDED ROD, THERE IS NO NEED EVER TO HAVE A LINE WHOSE HEAD SECTION EXCEEDS 50 FEET. Regardless of what the packaging, ad copy, or other sales literature claims the line will do for you, match the fly line's head length to your casting ability.
2. Mark your fly lines for length.
Marking your fly lines for length using waterproof ink will help you to make long casts consistently. For example, if the head of your fly line is 37 feet long, marking the fly line at 37 feet with a single bar around the circumference of the line tells you automatically how much line you need to have outside the rod tip before you can make your longest cast.
3. Use a fairly short overhang.
The amount of running line you hold between the end of the head section and the rod tip as you cast is called "overhang." All weight-forward floating fly lines will tolerate some amount of overhang, but if you try to overhang too much line your cast will simply collapse, as you're demanding a thin running line to turn over a thick head section. It's simply an inefficient transfer of energy. Anyone who has ever cast a shooting-head system has doubtless experienced this collapse. (Keep in mind that a shooting-head system is simply a radical version of a weight-forward line.)
The amount of running line you can comfortably overhang will vary with the design of the line as well as your own casting ability. For most casters, however, I recommend using no more than 3 or 4 feet of overhang with any weight-forward line. This will allow you to deliver a fly a fairly long distance with a short head section and a very modest shoot. For example, imagine you're using a fly line whose head is only 33 feet long, and that you're holding it outside the rod tip with 3 feet of overhang. Assuming that you're using a 9-foot rod with a 9-foot leader, if you can shoot only 6 additional feet of running line on the delivery, you can deliver your fly 60 feet--a very serviceable cast in many saltwater situations.



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  #7  
Old 01-25-2007, 02:11 AM
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FLOATSUM FLOATSUM is offline
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Default Re: Equipment/tackle assistance please.

Zimms has good advice there for you.
And I'd like to add;
Assuming it's a graphite rod (seems they all are now) I'd suggest a S/A (Scientific Anglers - 3M) line for your considerations. I suggest a floating line. It's easier to "pickup", easier to see strikes, can be adapted (loop to loop) with regular lead core line for depth and depth control. You can "mend" them easier in currents, less likely to get hampered in weeds and rocks.
I'd also suggest a 10 weight floating line. I find that for some danged reason, graphite's are under rated by manufacturing ASMA standards. And the little added weight helps to "make the rod work" and carry in a stiffer breeze (in time it wont matter as much, you'll find a way to fly in a gale).
As mentioned by Zimm, you want your belly not too long. Actually, for most in the salt, the shorter the better. And naturally, S/A has a darn good answer (IMHO) for that. Their "Mastery Series Salt Water Taper" is a weight forward line with only a 23 1/2 ft. belly. The tapers are interestingly short too with only 6 1/2 foot up front (I cut them back to 2 1/2 ft.) and the rear is 7 ft. Totaling only 37 to 33 feet all together that you need to keep out of your guides before "shooting". That makes for speed, easy, nice in the wind, and a "God's send" when your in tight quarters like down in the rocks, etc.
With the huge plus of being easy as falling off a rock to learn and handle. However, with everything there is a drawback. On this, it's "gentle control". It's a real bitch to land gently, but most of the time you don't need gentle, you'll need "driving against the wind" brute force and little wind resistance. The smallish diameter is a great help.
Personally, I don't get fancy with leaders, they don't last long if your fishing the right spots anyways. 1 fish, new leader (my reasons are justified). I carry larger (abrasion resistant) bulk spools of Ande or Big Game (cheap Benny's stuff) in 20 - 25 - 30# premade leaders in a pouch, several are already tied on flies, thus the reason for the Loop to loop connection at the leader / mainline joint,,, quick change,,,, no cutting/tying/fumbling/loosing valuable "they're in" time. Simple overhand 1 1/2" loop. I'll tye in with surgeons for droppers but you'll not be wanting any part of that yet.
On the end of that you'll be needing a fly, DO NOT get the heavy ones. Get some that have a big profile but not a lot of bulk. We refer to them as "sparsely tied". What this does is Not hold water, which in turn is like throwing a boat anchor with a tooth pick (sucks believe me). Of course this part will frustrate the tar out of you. Most you'll fling will be made with enough material for tying 4+ flies! AVOID them at all cost.
Oh, on the fly line,,,, what you want is designated by " S/A WF-10-F Saltwater Taper" It's about a $60 line (I've bought them off Ebay for $5.00 to $20.00, but you need to watch for them) Sounds like a lot of $ for a line, but it's economical in the long run. I've had some for years and just retired them out of guilt (and a bargain). 3 of mine are set that way. Have one with a level line on it too for special occasions. You may want to investigate that at a later date too.
Something else I'll comment on. Balance,,,, I mean BALANCE! With the reel and line on the rod your really going to appreciate a Butt heavy rod. At the least, hold the rod like your getting ready to hurl. notice where your ring finger is, you want the balancing point of the outfit no further forward than your ring finger. It's a "fatigue" thing. Reason I mention that is because way to many reel makers are struggling to make a feather weight reel. I refer to them as "tendinitis inducers". Seriously, you get a tip heavy and your arm will scream in no time. Get that balance point back and it's like nothing in weight. Example, Pickup a 8 ft 2X4 on 1 end,,, a bitch isn't it? but in the center (balanced) it's squat. So you may want to keep that in mind.
Cripes, this is beginning to look like a novel or something.
Someone else will add more I'm sure.
Enjoy, it's different!
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  #8  
Old 01-27-2007, 07:14 PM
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zimno1 zimno1 is offline
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Default Re: Equipment/tackle assistance please.

if i were inclined to use a specific line (if i could afford one) it would be the new RIO "saltwater line" even the OUTBOUND or the SALTWATER CAMO TIP would be my 2nd and 3rd choice. but that;s me, i use a shooting head because i;m using a spey rod now and clearly want a few extra feet and it just seems right. my 9w 9' rod has 10w floating wonderline on it and is casting fine and although i HATE orvis it does cast nice. I am going to the flyfishing show tomorrow if for no other reason than to see Simon Gawesworth cast a spey rod at 3pm. some things just have to be seen to be appreciated.



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  #9  
Old 02-21-2007, 02:30 PM
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khary23 khary23 is offline
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Default Re: Equipment/tackle assistance please.

Wow that was a lot of great info. I am also new to fly fishing, and found the post really helpful. I had one question are tapered leaders necessary? I got a few pre made leaders with my reel and was wandering why I couldnt just tie a regular leader on to the fly line. My reel also came with a DVD by Lefty Kreh that has really helped with casting, I sugest any other newbies pick it up.
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  #10  
Old 02-21-2007, 02:33 PM
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khary23 khary23 is offline
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Default Re: Equipment/tackle assistance please.

i just found this on ebay if anyone is interested its the S/A master saltwater for $32.50 + $5.75 S/H

http://cgi.ebay.com/SCIENTIFIC-ANGLE...QQcmdZViewItem
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  #11  
Old 02-23-2007, 06:58 PM
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zimno1 zimno1 is offline
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Default Re: Equipment/tackle assistance please.

a tapered leader is just to better turn the line/fly over better. (if you match it up right) a fly line tapers and the leader should be closest in diameter to the end you are tying to, in saltwater it is not used universally as distance sometimes isn't that important (in many situations) an orvis 20 lb tapered leader is like 7 feet long and will taper to what appears in hand to only be 10 lb test if that, but the strength of the leader (in water) holds roughly that and not much more. unless you cut some back to say 5 feet. then your odds of a breakoff are reduced imo



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