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  #1  
Old 04-16-2014, 12:14 AM
Stuck at the surf's Avatar
Stuck at the surf Stuck at the surf is offline
Have you tried tripping tourists with your mono?
 
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Default Favorite Spring Striper Lures

With the Striper season in NY fast approaching, I wanted to get some opinions in on which lures may work early in the season.

I know that using clams or bloodworms is a preferred method early in the Spring but I prefer scouting out an area with a lure

Also, I'm thinking about using some freshwater lures in the salt after some hook changes, do any of you have experience with using freshwater lures in salt?

Tight lines, and good luck to those of you who are flounder fishin
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  #2  
Old 04-24-2014, 09:04 PM
JimmyCo JimmyCo is offline
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Default Re: Favorite Spring Striper Lures

I have been out there the past two weeks working different lures pretty hard with no success. I fish mostly the hudson and sometimes on SI so I have been trying to fit my lures with whatever is running/ or being eaten, so far blood worms and herring. Anyone have any luck with any plastics?
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  #3  
Old 04-30-2014, 08:22 PM
BlockIslandGreen BlockIslandGreen is offline
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Location: Denville, NJ
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Default Re: Favorite Spring Striper Lures

Fish are still sluggish and not really wanting to move too much to grab a lure, that's why worms work better this time of year, they are easy to eat. Personally, I don't fish live bait or chunks, ever...including clams. I fly fish and tie my own flies, including Herring patterns. However, I also throw all sorts of lures with a surf rod, mostly wood. I wanted to preface my advice so you knew it was coming from a total NON BAIT enthusiast.

Sounds like you want to throw lures, form what you said in your post. Right now, Lunker City plastics, especially Shakers in the larger sizes, or Sluggos, either or weighted with 1 1/2 oz or whatever you need to get down based on current, is the best bet. When the bite turns on, these same plastics will suddenly sleigh fish. A safe color choice is Aelwife. You can get all fancy and get all White, Pearl Ice, Limetreuse, Bubblegum..etc. Most tributary spots, outflows, back bays, places where you tend to be this time of year all have one thing in common....murky water.

Plastics are at a distinct dis-advantage to bait thanks to the above mentioned sluggish effect due to cold water temps and also because the fish can't see or smell your offering. Some guys will use a little "scent" on their lures. Bio-edge makes the best assortment. I obviously won't favor doing that personally.

Instead, if you can find a spot where you know there are fish holding, you can guarantee they are on the bottom. You'll have to literally hit them on the head to get them to take. If they won't take, you need to go down to a a smaller Lunker City Finesse Fish (white usually works best for me) and get it down to the bottom, then drift it super slow. 20 Fish+ days can be had with this technique. I've personally caught 40+ up on the Thames River in CT this time of year. Its still the pre-bite time of year, so expect slow going and stay away from any and FAST lure retrieves as they will be literally fruitless.
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  #4  
Old 04-30-2014, 08:28 PM
BlockIslandGreen BlockIslandGreen is offline
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Default Re: Favorite Spring Striper Lures

When the bite gets into swing, do most of your fishing at night. That will also help big time. Also, if you don't have a Black Bomber, get one. That should be a primary go to type early season "plug." I also throw a Gag's Mambo Minnow (Bubblegum & Blue Back Herring). A Cotton Cordell RedFin Shad, in Smokey Joe or Glow White would also be an alternative.

I also LOVE the Rapala X-Rap in all three sizes in Bunker and Pearl. These lures feature strong castability and a sonic vibration effect that when moved fast, then stopped or slow, then repeated will imitate the exact way a Bunker swims. However, right now the menu has mostly Herring, River Herring/Alewifes on the table so stick to Bomber and Gags and you'll out-produce most lure chuckers...along with the Plastics I mentioned in the first post.
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Old 04-30-2014, 09:42 PM
JimmyCo JimmyCo is offline
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Default Re: Favorite Spring Striper Lures

Thanks Block! I appreciate all of the information. After a couple of seasons of always getting crappy bait and having little luck I decided to try getting more into lures this year so your advice as a non bait enthusiast is welcome.
I have been trying things that would in my mind at least imitate herring, worms and eels. Have you tried out the Yo-zuri lures? I picked up a few, and I have been trying the mag minnow in silver which looks pretty close to a herring but i think my retrieve has been a little to fast. Also I have been working bucktails with Gulp grubs as teasers. You think its early to start with bucktails?

Anyway I just ordered some of the lunker city shakers, the rappala xrap (although i couldnt get the colors you mentioned so im gonna try the gold), and i picked up a cotton cordel as well. Gonna try them out this weekend. thanks man.
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  #6  
Old 05-01-2014, 06:38 PM
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TFKiv TFKiv is offline
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Default Re: Favorite Spring Striper Lures

The small, shallow river I mostly fish has schools of sand eels. My best springtime, (or anytime really), lure to use there is a small 5" to 7" silver and blue slug-go on a jig head, with some hackle tied just behind the jig head. Usually the action that works for me can be starting with the rod tip at around 1 o'clock, jig- jig- jig the tip to about 4 o'clock, then reel the slack as you bring the tip back to 1 o'clock, and repeat.

To answer your question on using fresh water lures.... I find some to be interchangeable, like a deadly dick, rattletrap, and bombers/divers etc.
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  #7  
Old 05-02-2014, 12:47 PM
BlockIslandGreen BlockIslandGreen is offline
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Default Re: Favorite Spring Striper Lures

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimmyCo View Post
Thanks Block! I appreciate all of the information. After a couple of seasons of always getting crappy bait and having little luck I decided to try getting more into lures this year so your advice as a non bait enthusiast is welcome.
I have been trying things that would in my mind at least imitate herring, worms and eels. Have you tried out the Yo-zuri lures? I picked up a few, and I have been trying the mag minnow in silver which looks pretty close to a herring but i think my retrieve has been a little to fast. Also I have been working bucktails with Gulp grubs as teasers. You think its early to start with bucktails?

Anyway I just ordered some of the lunker city shakers, the rappala xrap (although i couldnt get the colors you mentioned so im gonna try the gold), and i picked up a cotton cordel as well. Gonna try them out this weekend. thanks man.
Nice, have fun bro. Certain lures love slow retrieves, especially with a little current present. That's why I think the #1 choice is a Bomber. We use Wonderbread, Chicken Scratch and Black all through the early season.AS I mentioned, they are decidedly better at night. Bring it back just fast enough to feel a little thump, thump, thump. Slow retrieves are the name of the game. It can be a challenge if you have a fast reel.

Van Stalls were made with slow retrieves (for eel slinging) in mind, but the drawback is that they are one dimensional and they take too long to get tight after a longer cast. Pick your poison. I go with a faster Shimano (Stella) which is super pricey and requires constant care not to damage it & regular rinsing and lubrication as needed. I don't like really heavy reels either, for lure fishing. It makes it tough to impart action to the lure.

The X-Rap is really a specific imitator so I would try to find the Bunker at least, it will be a true go to bait for the summer. The drawback with the X-Rap is that the coating is not durable. If Blues are around, they will destroy it. The pluses outweigh the drawbacks because I haven't found a lure better around jetties and structure. It suspends, wiggles, pules and really looks like the real thing. This lure is one of the best daytime lures you will find. I like to rip the retrieve fast, than just flat out stop. Then rip fast, then stop. After a while of doing it, you will discover the rhythm of the pulse that causes stripers to smash these things during the summer months.

One other little tip is to learn to tie a teaser. The best Teasers are made with bucktail and angel hair blended in. Kind of sparse and size/proportion to match the lure you are going to fit it on. By getting rid of the treble hook on the ass end of a stick bait and fitting it with a teaser tied on a single siawash type hook (using two split rings to attach to the body, riding the hook point facing up) you just doubled the effectiveness of a slow retrieve by making the bait appear much more life like. You don't need to go crazy with this technique, but fitting a Red Fin Shad or a Gags Grabber for early season fishing is a huge win.

Regarding the early season fishing, Herring spawn at night only. As the tide rises, they gather at the mouth of the area they are going to run up. They spawn in DOWNRIGHT SURPRISING places. As you cross little bridges along the coast at night, shine a Cyclops Light into the water. If you use a Red Lense, the fish won't spook. In certain places you'll see swarms of Herring. You can learn a ton watching them at night, if you get the chance, look at how they swim. Their entire body wiggles. They are truly beautiful bait fish and you may see some big eye Stripers lurking around as well. They almost look like monsters at night. Trying to imitate a Herring during the day is WAY tougher work. They scatter out in deeper water. The outgoing tide at night in the right spot can be a real bonanza and all you really need is the good old Black Bomber. At night you don't need the teaser tail either, it doesn't seem to help. If you really want the best way to imitate a herring, a white or black double rigged sluggo (expensive for a soft plastic) is a terrific imitator as well. I always carry one.

I hear a lot of guys say you need to load a Red-Fin Shad to make it cast better. I couldn't disagree more. Not only does the action diminish, but the gain is really not all that much. Instead, how about using a rod that is rated tip sensitive so it will "LOAD!" I use a 9 or 10" Ron Arra by Lamiglass for this type of fishing. It will throw a Cotton Cordell or a Gag's Grabber a shockingly far distance. Unloaded. Now you have a very lively bait that is working side to side with minimal effort. Results go up when you do this.

Lure guys need the right rod, most are way too stiff. I have tried them all and I like the Lamiglass line of Ron Arra's and Surf/Jetty Rods. Some say they don't have enough back bone for super heavy current but I pull 40+ pounders out of the Cape Cod Canal every year with zero issues. Just use side pressure instead of pointing the damn rod straight up. wow. I fish the Canal at sun up and throughout the...night. I have a surf rod and conventional rod with me at all times. My Surf Rod at that point is an 11" Ron Arra rated for 1 to 3 oz. Lures. It casts a mile and that's why I use it. It also is the best at imparting action and loading correctly with lighter baits, which come into play sometimes at night. If you get a chance, head up there in late May or Early June and experience true lure fishing! And for those that want to play during the day or night with chunks, worms and eels, be my guest.

As for the Yozuri, if you wanna play with a Crystal Mag Minnow, they do work well and a lot of guys like them. They're big and they are built very well & are proven. The one Yo-Zuri that has pounded fish (especially in blitzes) for years is the Hydro-Pencil. Whether you're out on a boat or lucky enough to get some blitzing on the shore, the Tutti Fruity or the Glow White have been LETHAL killers, stop, start, sit, move, stop type retrieves. IF fish are hitting on small to mid sized baitfish they will wack these things with regularity. Stripers go bonkers for them. Some guides I know up in CT will use the Blue/Siler one to imitate the early season Atlantic Herring (5" fish) and their clients will have 40 or more fish days all on the top. See Dan Woods of CT Fish/Waterfoul for more info. He's also a HUGE advocate of Sluggos because out in the swifter currents, they have the abilityy to slash back and forth exactly like real baitfish do when they flee.

To your last question, it is never the wrong time to use a bucktail. I use Andrus Bucktails (tying your own is not worth it to me) with Uncle Josh Sea Strips (5") single tail pork rinds, these are far better than curly tail grubs as teasers because they flutter in stiff currents where the plastic tails straighten off...PLUS, they can't be destroyed by even the toothiest Blues where the grubs get bit right off. Just get a small assortment of 3/4, 1 and 1 1/4 oz. bucktails which will mostly cover it. Go to 2oz and up only when serious currents are in play or you're out on the boat. Remember, let it flutter down to the bottom, yank it up and let it flutter back down. Honestly, this type of fishing is far better accomplished with a conventional reel (with a star drag, not a lever) and relatively tip sensitive 10" conventional rod (very hard to find these days). If you're going to do bucktails, might as well do 'em right!

That means you now have two rods, your spinning rod for the surf and your conventional set up, which is far superior for bait fishing and bucktailing. Better than a spinning reel known as a bait runner? Yes. Less versatile than a baitrunner? yes. Overall more expensive but superior for drifts of 300 yards or more. Lethal way to fish. Becoming kind of a lost art these days too. I see mostly bait runner guys along rivers these days. The reason is the versatility and the lower cost of not needing two rods.
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