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  #76  
Old 01-28-2010, 01:55 AM
Huck Finn Huck Finn is offline
 
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Default Re: Menhaden** News: "The Latest"

Quote:
Originally Posted by zimno1 View Post
Depending on which of the ten species of "so called" asian carp you are refferring to. grass carp have done the most damage as they initially feed on zooplankton and small copopods but grow to feed on plant matter. when the prefferred plant matter is depleted they start to feed on fish. these fish have (not many) but a row or two of teeth in the back of thier mouths to process food so fish promote no problem to eat. most of the several species of carp have the same eating habits depending where these species are prevalent. one of the worst eco disasters of our time. if it were possible to harvest them for market like that "not a totally bad idea", but fish eating fish (for the omega market) is not all that desirable. as i read that somewhere for whatever reason it was.. Carp was a staple the diet of the american indian as well as shad. our caretakers of this land of ours knew how to keep the order of all living things in check. we came and really screwed it up.
The Asian carp I am refering to are the big head and the silver carp species. The silver carp are the ones that like to jump out of the water like a salmon. You-Tube silver carp and you will see just how numerous these fish are. I was fishing on the Ohio River one day this summer and had 7 silver carp jump in my boat. These two species of carp are destroying our fishing waters and are even making boating on the water somewhat dangerous. It sure would be great if a market for these invasive fish could be started.





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  #77  
Old 03-01-2010, 10:33 AM
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Default Bush Family and Omega Oil

Here's a little tid bit to chew on . Omega used to be owned by the Bush Family. Might still be.

****
Edit additional info
Heres the story. George H. Bush has owned Zapata Oil since 1952.

In 1968, Reedville Oil and Guano Company was renamed Haynie Products, Inc., and in 1970, they merged with Zapata Oil to form Zapata Haynie Corporation. In 1990, Zapata was renamed Zapata Protein; with the change to Omega Protein following eight years later.

http://www.omegaproteininc.com/about/history.aspx
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  #78  
Old 03-01-2010, 10:33 AM
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Default Lawsuit claims PCBs found in 10 fish oil supplements; product labeling sought

Lawsuit claims PCBs found in 10 fish oil supplements; product labeling sought

By JONDI GUMZ

http://www.mercurynews.com/ci_145015...ury News Story


SANTA CRUZ - People buying certain fish oil supplements to get the benefit of omega-3 fatty acids are ingesting chemicals banned in 1979, according to environmental advocates who filed a lawsuit Monday aimed at forcing manufacturers to warn consumers.
The lawsuit names five makers of supplements found to contain polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, drugstores CVS and Rite Aid, which sell those products, and Omega Protein Inc., of Houston, which touts itself as the world's largest producer of omega-3 fish oil.
Attorney David Roe filed the suit in San Francisco Superior Court contending Proposition 65, a law he helped write, requires consumers to be warned when products contain toxic ingredients above the limit deemed safe by regulators.
Some of the tested supplements exceed California's daily limit for PCBs by a factor of 10 in terms of the cancer risk, Roe said.
A limit has not been set for the risk of birth defects. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has been studying that risk for 20 years, said co-plaintiff Benson Chiles, director of the Coastal Ocean Coalition in New Jersey.
"Our message to the public is: 'Buyer beware,'" Chiles said.
Manufacturers of the supplements contest the results of the tests, saying their products are safe.
Two companies whose products were tested issued swift responses.
Twinlab's chief science officer, Greg Grochoski, said the two Twinlab Norwegian cod liver oils tested are distilled to reduce impurities such as PCBs and meet government standards.

"Twinlab cannot comment on the validity or accuracy of the test results referenced in a press release" issued by the California plaintiffs, added spokesman Justin Boone, noting Twinlab products were reported as having among the lowest levels of impurities.
Stephen McCauley of public relations firm Porter Novelli responded for Pharmavite LLC, which makes Nature Made fish oil supplements, saying its products comply with all federal laws as well as "the stringent industry standards" set by the Council for Responsible Nutrition, a trade group.
"PCBs are ubiquitous within the environment, which means that all fish - whether fish found in oceans and rivers or fish oil supplements - contain at least trace amounts of PCBs," said Erin Hlasney of the Council for Responsible Nutrition. "The lawyers are using California's Prop. 65 statute to bring attention to their case by attempting to frame this as a public health concern, when in reality, fish oil has enjoyed decades of safe use."
Chris Manthey, a Surfrider volunteer in New Jersey and one of the plaintiffs, said, "Many of them say their supplements have been 'treated' to remove or reduce PCBs. Since they don't say how much PCB contamination is still left, even consumers who choose 'treated' supplements can't know what PCB levels they're swallowing."
The tests, done by a California lab at a cost of $1,000 per product, measured PCBs two ways, according to the plaintiffs.
One way determines daily exposure to PCBs by looking at all 209 separate compounds in the PCB chemical family. The second way looks at toxicity based on the 12 most toxic compounds in the PCB family.
Some supplements did better on one test than the other. Now Foods cod liver oil and salmon oil were high in daily exposure to PCBs and lower on the toxicity measure. Nature Made cod liver oil was high in terms of the toxicity measure and lower in terms of daily exposure if taken as directed.
Roe said more expensive products did not necessarily get better results.
The plaintiffs, which include the Mateel Environmental Justice Foundation of Eureka, said they selected products based on a survey by the Environmental Defense Fund of fish oil purification practices at 75 companies.
"We were not cherry-picking," said Manthey, noting the exposure level for Now Foods shark liver oil was low.
Scott Daniel, marketing communications manager at Now Foods, said the company has been investigating the concerns raised by environmental advocates for months.
"The current testing methods for PCBs are highly variable and incomplete," Daniel said. "There are no universal standards to test for the 209 different compounds that are included under the term PCB. However, we believe we are in compliance with the most widely followed industry and regulatory standards."
Daniel recommended consumers choose products made from small fish with short life spans, such as anchovies and sardines.
Solgar and GNC, manufacturers of other products named in the lawsuit, did not respond immediately.
New Leaf Community Market, a local organic health food chain, has been stocking nine brands of fish oil supplements at its Felton store, but once vitamins manager Tracy Frankl heard about the lawsuit, she pulled Twinlab's emulsified Norwegian cod liver oil off the shelf.
"We don't want to sell a product we don't feel is safe," said New Leaf co-owner Scott Roseman.
He said New Leaf would talk to fish oil manufacturers about their products and their labeling.
Three local companies make supplements with fish oil, but none was tested for this lawsuit.
"We feel consumers should have access to accurate information about environmental contaminants and that complete transparency around freshness and purity is very, very important," said Tiffany Diehl, strategic project manager at Nordic Naturals in Watsonville.
The company has participated in third-party testing and posts results on its Web site, she said.
Marci Clow, senior product research director at Rainbow Light in Santa Cruz, declined to comment and Threshold Enterprises of Scotts Valley did not immediately respond.
Soquel resident Madelaine Hairrell, who takes fish oil to lower cholesterol, was surprised by the findings.
"It may change the way I take supplements," she said. "I look on the labels to see which is the most natural and unpolluted. I try to get the best quality I can afford."

10 PRODUCTS TESTED
n Nature Made cod liver oil and odorless fish oil; manufacturer Pharmavite LLC in Northridge
n Twinlab Norwegian cod liver oil and emulsified Norwegian cod liver oil; manufactured in American Fork, Utah
n Now Foods shark liver oil, double strength cod liver oil and salmon oil; manufactured in Bloomingdale, Ill.
n Solgar 100 percent pure Norwegian shark liver oil complex and Norwegian cod liver oil; manufactured in Leonia, N.J.
n GNC liquid Norwegian cod liver oil; manufactured in Pittsburgh
Lab tests of these 10 fish oil supplements containing omega-3 fatty acids found they contain some of the 209 polychlorinated biphenyl compounds known to cause cancer and birth defects.
PCBs became subject to California's Prop. 65 warning requirement in 1989 for cancer and in 1991 for birth defects. Once widely used in electrical transformers, PCBs were banned by Congress in 1979, but the Great Lakes and the Hudson River remain contaminated despite cleanup efforts. The chemical, which was made to last a long time without breaking down, accumulates in the food chain.
SOURCE: www.fishoilsafety.com
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  #79  
Old 03-23-2010, 07:23 PM
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Default There's no problem with menhaden population

There's no problem with menhaden population, only what is believed about it
Bay Journal Article - February 2010

Ron Lukens has worked more than 20 years in the field of fisheries management, spending 17 years as the assistant executive director of the Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission. Lukens serves as the senior fisheries biologist for Omega Protein, assisting in the understanding of the population of menhaden stocks based upon published scientific literature. He is also an appointed member of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission's Menhaden Advisory Panel.


*************************************************************************
Comment rebuttal March issue 2010

Menhaden madness
I am compelled to comment on the commentary, There's no problem with menhaden population, only what is believed about it (February 2010).
At the outset, Ron Lukens states "since the fisheries inception in the 1700s, the Atlantic menhaden population is as robust and healthy today as it has ever been". FACT: The 2006 stock assessment shows a 72 percent decline in abundance from 1979 to 2006. Doesn't seem very "robust" to me.
He correctly states that for years the stock assessments have characterized the stock as "not overfished and overfishing is not occurring."
The upcoming stock assessment will not be presenting such a rosy picture. This time, the assessment will contain data on mortality by age classes and will demonstrate severe overfishing of the age 3+ (breeding stock). Any wonder why recruitment is in the cellar Recommendations on corrective measures are to be included. This represents such a departure from prior years that we will have to wait to see if it passes peer review.
Lukens comments on the filtration capabilities of menhaden to "clean coastal waters" are interesting. He states that "most scientists know this is not true." Strange, there are many studies that attest to menhaden's capability to remove particulates from the water. The Virginia Institute of Marine Science study he refers to concluded that only age 0 and 1 have the capability to remove nitrogen, which has been the object of most concern and study. In the Chesapeake Bay, the particle size of algae has diminished and renders the larger menhaden ineffective.
Nitrogen is not the only factor to consider. Sediment is a serious problem in Bay waters and menhaden remove this also. No mention is made of any removals other than nitrogen, which tends to undervalue the filtering capacity of menhaden. Menhaden may not be able to "clean coastal waters" but they help to do so.
It also should be noted that according to National Marine Fisheries Service data for 2009, age 0 and 1 removals by the reduction fishery comprised 47 percent of the catch. Certainly not helping the Chesapeake Bay.
I note that Lukens states that "most scientists and managers would agree that fisheries management could use more money to fund research and data collection." Well, if I were a scientist during a time of diminished economy I'd welcome an income stream. Also, research breeds more research.
Managers may also agree because waiting for a silver bullet allows difficult decisions to be deferred. The five years of research have not provided a basis for management action.
[i]The problem here is not a lack of information, it is a lack of management. Perhaps the best research would be to figure out how to get managers to manage.

Charles Hutchinson
Cambridge, MD
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  #80  
Old 03-23-2010, 07:23 PM
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Default Re: Menhaden** News: "The Latest"

VA legislators kill bills to transfer menhaden management to VMRC






http://www.bayjournal.com/article.cfm?article=3792

By Karl Blankenship
The debate over who could best manage Virginia's menhaden fishery proved to be short-lived.
Legislation introduced on the first day of the General Assembly session which would have transferred oversight from legislators to the Virginia Marine Resources Commission was killed in both the House and Senate by the end of January.
State Sen. Ralph Northam, D-Norfolk, who sponsored the Senate version, pulled the bill without a vote knowing defeat was inevitable. Meanwhile, a House subcommittee killed an identical bill from Sen. John Cosgrove, R-Chesapeake.
"I guess the time for this just isn't right yet," Cosgrove told the Virginian-Pilot after the subcommittee action.
While the commission manages all of the other saltwater fisheries in the state, such as blue crabs, striped bass and oysters, the state legislature has long maintained authority to regulate catches of menhaden, which supports a major commercial fishery that provides about 250 jobs in Reedville, on Virginia's Northern Neck peninsula.
Cosgrove and Northam said management would improve by unifying responsibility for all saltwater species under the VMRC.
Ben Landry, a spokesman for Texas-based Omega Protein, which operates the Reedville fishing fleet, questioned the value of the transfer, noting that the VMRC has already been hit by huge budget cuts and adding menhaden would increase its workload.
Environmentalists and sport fishing groups endorsed the bill. Stock assessments over the years show that stocks of the the small, oily fish are healthy overall. But many fishermen and environmentalists contend menhaden are overfished in the Bay, leaving too few to feed striped bass and other predators, or filter algae from the water.
Such a transfer of authority has come up before, most recently in 1994, when it failed to pass. Meanwhile, the Senate did approve a bill that extends the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission's limit on menhaden harvests within in the Chesapeake to 109,020 metric tons annually through 2013. A similar bill was expected to pass the House.
If the legislature fails to pass a bill complying with the ASMFC action, the state would be out of compliance and could face sanctions. The ASMFC enacted the cap to give scientists time to determine whether the fishery was adversely affecting menhaden populations in the Bay.
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  #81  
Old 08-09-2010, 12:41 PM
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Default Re: Menhaden** News: "The Latest"

Menhaden will just have to wait

Baltimore Sun
Candace Thomson blog
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  #82  
Old 08-10-2010, 09:06 AM
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Default Re: Menhaden** News: "The Latest"

ATLANTIC MENHADEN MANAGEMENT BOARD (August 3, 2010)
Meeting Summary
The Board reviewed state compliance and the FMP Review for 2009 and found all jurisdictions
to be in compliance with the plan. Reported coastwide landings for 2009 were 181,674 metric
tons (reduction fishery: 143,800 mt + bait fishery: 37,874 mt).
The Technical Committee and Multi-Species Technical Committee presented their initial
findings and work plans to address the Board tasks to develop alternative reference points. The
Board provided both committees further guidance to refine its tasks. In addition, the Board
initiated an addendum to include options for alternative reference points of percent spawning
potential ratio (SPR) at the current level (10%), as well as 15%, 25%, and 40%. A draft
addendum will be presented to the Board at the Commission’s Annual Meeting in November.
The Board received a presentation from the Virginia Institute of Marine Science regarding a
study it conducted to estimate menhaden’s net removal of nitrogen from Chesapeake Bay.
The Board approved the nomination of Donald Swanson (NH) to the Menhaden Advisory Panel.
For more information, please contact Brad Spear, Senior Fishery Management Plan Coordinator
for Policy, at (202) 289-6400 or [email protected].
Motions
Move to accept the FMP review report and approve de minimis status for South Carolina,
Georgia, and Florida.
Motion made by Mr. Augustine, second by Mr. Carpenter. Motion approved.
Move to initiate an addendum to consider a range of percent MSP reference points
including the current level, 15%, 25% and 40% MSP.
Motion made by Mr. Simpson, second by Mr. R. White. Motion carries (16 in favor).
Move to approve the nomination of Donald Swanson (NH) to the Advisory Panel.
Motion made by Mr. Grout, second by Mr. P. White. Motion carries.
Motion to continue the Chesapeake Bay Reduction cap for 2011.
Motion made by Mr. Goldsborough, second by Mr. P. White. Motion tabled until Annual
Meeting.
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  #83  
Old 01-31-2011, 02:30 PM
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Default Re: Menhaden** News: "The Latest"

By Scott Harper
The Virginian-Pilot
© January 22, 2011

Several bills to more tightly control menhaden fishing in the Chesapeake Bay were killed or dropped this week by state lawmakers, a similar fate to past attempts to limit this commercial fishery that has been a staple in Virginia for more than a century.
Only Virginia and, to a lesser degree, North Carolina continue to allow the industrialized taking of menhaden on the Atlantic coast.
Menhaden are small, oily fish that are netted by the millions and converted into fish oil, pet food and health supplements at a processing plant in Reedville, a village in northeast Virginia on the shores of the Chesapeake.
Environmentalists and sportsmen have been trying in vain for years to limit this harvest, which they say has damaging ripple effects among other fish species, including the popular rockfish, and to the Bay's fragile ecosystem.
This year, six menhaden bills were introduced in the General Assembly, including four from Hampton Roads lawmakers. One, from Del. Harry R. Purkey, R-Virginia Beach, sought to ban menhaden catches within one mile of Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Newport News and Hampton.
Another, from Del. Barry Knight, R-Virginia Beach, would have phased out all menhaden harvests in state waters over the next five years.
And another measure from Del. John Cosgrove, R-Chesapeake, would have shifted the oversight of the menhaden fishery to the Virginia Marine Resources Commission. The General Assembly now regulates menhaden, the only species managed by lawmakers.
A companion bill - sponsored by Sen. Ralph Northam, D-Norfolk - empowering the VMRC is scheduled for a Senate hearing
Monday, though its chances are seen as remote.
"I'd like to know one legislator smart enough to make scientific decisions about this fish species," Cosgrove said Friday after his bill's defeat Thursday night in a subcommittee. "It's stupid that we do it this way."
By rejecting the bills, lawmakers handed another victory to Omega Protein, a Texas-based company that runs the Reedville plant and carries considerable political clout in Richmond. Gov. Bob McDonnell sided with Omega and opposed all of this year's legislation.
Omega is generous with campaign contributions, giving nearly $78,000 to mostly Republican politicians, including McDonnell, from May 2009 to April 2010, according to records compiled by the Virginia Public Access Project.
Ben Landry, a spokesman for Omega, was pleased that Virginia lawmakers acted the way they did this week, saying the company has lived without violations under a quota system for years, and that there is no scientific evidence that menhaden populations in the Bay are in trouble.
In addition to Omega, others who opposed the bills at a House Agriculture, Chesapeake and Natural Resources subcommittee hearing Thursday were the AFL-CIO, plant workers and residents of Reedville.
Three lawmakers pulled their bills from consideration before the hearing.
The Omega plant is a major employer on the rural Northern Neck peninsula and is the lone menhaden processing center left in Reedville.
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Old 01-31-2011, 02:32 PM
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Default Re: Menhaden** News: "The Latest"

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The General Assembly now regulates menhaden, the only species managed by lawmakers.
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  #85  
Old 03-24-2011, 01:30 PM
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Default Menhaden** News: "The Latest"

ASMFC takes first steps to rebuild menhaden forage base



ALEXANDRIA, VA – For the first time ever, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission took steps to rein in the industrial harvest of menhaden and begin the process of managing the menhaden fishery. If adopted, the measures proposed today by the Menhaden Management Board would lead to a reduction of menhaden harvest in both the reduction and bait fisheries.

“After years of inaction, this is an excellent first step toward recovering a critical forage base,” said Richen Brame, CCA Atlantic States Fisheries director. “This action is significant, simply because the science on menhaden as a vital forage base is improving, and it is the science that is now driving this process. Some folks will feel that the proposals today do not go far enough, but it is imperative to point out that although this does not get us across the plate, it does get us in scoring position.”

The latest menhaden stock assessment showed the stock was undergoing overfishing and abundance estimates were at the lowest level ever recorded.****Current science indicates that the menhaden spawning stock biomass is at about 9 percent of a stock that is not subjected to any fishing pressure. The Menhaden Management Board voted to start an addendum that would increase the spawning stock biomass to15 percent.

“That would end overfishing, cause about a 10 percent reduction in landings, and potentially increase spawning stock by more than 50 percent,” said Brame.

These are interim measures that will likely be in place for three to five years until a Multi-Species Virtual Population Analysis can be conducted, which will require stock assessment updates on bluefish, striped bass, weakfish and menhaden stock.

“When that analysis is conducted, it is very possible we will have a much better idea of the population of menhaden needed to fully serve as the critical forage base for those popular sport fish,” said Brame. “The picture is constantly evolving, and we appreciate that the Menhaden Management Board worked to develop a suite of management options to use in the interim that will begin rebuilding menhaden.”

The draft addendum will be developed over the summer to be approved for public comment at the ASMFC’s August meeting.**** Public hearings will be held along the entire Atlantic seaboard this fall, with final action at the ASMFC’s November Annual Meeting in Massachusetts. If adopted, management restrictions could be in place for the 2012 fishing season.

###

CCA is the largest marine resource conservation group of its kind in the nation. With almost 100,000 members in 17 state chapters, CCA has been active in state, national and international fisheries management issues since 1977. For more information visit the CCA Newsroom at www.JoinCCA.org.



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  #86  
Old 03-24-2011, 01:30 PM
archiver archiver is offline
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Default Menhaden** News: "The Latest"

ASMFC takes first steps to rebuild menhaden forage base



ALEXANDRIA, VA – For the first time ever, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission took steps to rein in the industrial harvest of menhaden and begin the process of managing the menhaden fishery. If adopted, the measures proposed today by the Menhaden Management Board would lead to a reduction of menhaden harvest in both the reduction and bait fisheries.

“After years of inaction, this is an excellent first step toward recovering a critical forage base,” said Richen Brame, CCA Atlantic States Fisheries director. “This action is significant, simply because the science on menhaden as a vital forage base is improving, and it is the science that is now driving this process. Some folks will feel that the proposals today do not go far enough, but it is imperative to point out that although this does not get us across the plate, it does get us in scoring position.”

The latest menhaden stock assessment showed the stock was undergoing overfishing and abundance estimates were at the lowest level ever recorded.****Current science indicates that the menhaden spawning stock biomass is at about 9 percent of a stock that is not subjected to any fishing pressure. The Menhaden Management Board voted to start an addendum that would increase the spawning stock biomass to15 percent.

“That would end overfishing, cause about a 10 percent reduction in landings, and potentially increase spawning stock by more than 50 percent,” said Brame.

These are interim measures that will likely be in place for three to five years until a Multi-Species Virtual Population Analysis can be conducted, which will require stock assessment updates on bluefish, striped bass, weakfish and menhaden stock.

“When that analysis is conducted, it is very possible we will have a much better idea of the population of menhaden needed to fully serve as the critical forage base for those popular sport fish,” said Brame. “The picture is constantly evolving, and we appreciate that the Menhaden Management Board worked to develop a suite of management options to use in the interim that will begin rebuilding menhaden.”

The draft addendum will be developed over the summer to be approved for public comment at the ASMFC’s August meeting.**** Public hearings will be held along the entire Atlantic seaboard this fall, with final action at the ASMFC’s November Annual Meeting in Massachusetts. If adopted, management restrictions could be in place for the 2012 fishing season.

###

CCA is the largest marine resource conservation group of its kind in the nation. With almost 100,000 members in 17 state chapters, CCA has been active in state, national and international fisheries management issues since 1977. For more information visit the CCA Newsroom at www.JoinCCA.org.



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