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Jerry Vovcsko

First dunked a worm in Otsego Lake (upstate NY) some 68 years ago and began pursuing striped bass in Cape Cod waters 40 years ago. Pretty soon I should be able to get it right...maybe.

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October 28, 2015

Memories of Woodland Days

by Jerry Vovcsko

2015 Surplus Antlerless Deer Permits: (Permits will remain available until sold out in each Wildlife Management Zone)
•Zone 11 permits ARE SOLD OUT
•Zone 10 permits ARE SOLD OUT
•Zone 13 and 14 permits went on sale October 8th.

Well, so here we stand on the cusp between the gradually fading 2015 striped bass action and the impending hunting season in Massachusetts. Folks who hunt bear and wangle a permit will have at it come November 1st and on the 30th of November procuring a deer by shotgun becomes okay and later, in mid-December, the blackpowder folks get another crack at venison for the freezer.

All this used to mean a lot more to me before old football injuries put the kibosh on my knees' well-being and curtailed my hiking-in-the-woods days. I still manage to hobble around the local jetties and on occasion haul my aching bones into a sixteen foot skiff in order to dabble around the rocks and ledges at Nobska Point or Woods Hole Harbor in pursuit of the wily striped bass. But unless my son wants to plant his Old Man in a tree blind in the event some careless buck wanders by, my hunting days may be drawing to a close.

That realization comes with a sort of bittersweet tinge but all in all I have no complaints. Growing up as a youngster in upstate New York I had more than my share of hunting adventures and roamed the woods with a lever action, single shot, twenty-five caliber Stevens rifle – perfect for a young lad with limited funds. You hunt squirrels and partridge with a single-shot anything and you quickly learn the art of concentrating on a good sight picture…or you go home empty handed. By the time I turned ten years old I had learned to control my breathing, center the post in the V-notch of the rear sight and gently squeeeeze the trigger until the shot "surprised" me.

Later, during boot camp at Parris Island those forays into the woods with my old Stevens turned out to be good preparation in qualifying for a Sharpshooter's badge with a 214 score. I always felt I could have picked up the extra six points I needed to fire expert if I hadn't been such a reed-thin kid trying to hold steady in the offhand position with that 9.6lb M-1 Garand we were issued. I'd dial in the windage data the range officer provided but wished I could figure a way to keep my skinny arms still.

When I turned fourteen I graduated from the single-shot Stevens to my dad's bolt-action .22 Savage with a five round clip and the mortality rate of the local rabbit and squirrel population took a significant jump. But I was never profligate with ammunition – lessons of conserving ammo learned early stuck with me across the years and I generally expected to get a season or two out of a fifty-count box of .22 long rifle cartridges.

I may have gotten a tad overconfident around that time because I headed out one fall afternoon in search of the quail and pheasants that worked over the corn shocks in our neighbor's field and figured my dad's old double-barreled twelve gauge would suit me just fine for nailing a game bird or two. The Old Man had tried to tell me a little about the difference between the non-existent recoil of a twenty-two and what the 12-gauge held in store. But as I was sixteen now I had no need of such counsel, waved him off and strode confidently out across the fields.

My confidence lasted until a beautifully plumaged male ringneck came boiling out of a small stand of dried cornstalks a few feet ahead of me. Startled and a little off balance, I aimed in his general direction and yanked the trigger. I suppose it was the off-balance part that contributed to finding myself on the ground, on my ass, watching the bird flying off towards the tree line. That or maybe my having yanked both triggers simultaneously. My dad didn't say much when I got back home but a few days later I filled him in on the details and he nodded and allowed that a shotgun might take a little getting used to for a young feller just getting his feet wet bird hunting. He had the good grace to refrain from any I-told-you-so comments but the twinkle in his eye spoke volumes.

So it is that when I look back over the years I feel like I've had my share of hunting memories, and good ones they are. A few Christmases ago my son Rick presented me with an M-1 in pristine condition he'd bought through one of those government programs. There was a message on the card saying: "Because every Marine should have his M-1 around." Well, it sure means a lot to me and I take it out and clean it and re-live the days when fall meant a trip to the woods and, with a little luck, a supply of venison for the winter tucked away in the basement freezer.


But now it looks like hip replacement surgery is on the calendar for next spring and maybe I'll let the doc have go at my knees if the hip deal goes down smoothly.


The Miami Dolphins show up at Gillette Stadium Thursday night to assume their role in the 2015 Scorched Earth Tour that has so far produced a 6-0 record for the New England Patriots. And Roger Goodell takes his 0-6 record back into the courts hoping for the appeals court to change Judge Berman's ruling on DeflateGate. The wise-guys in Vegas give the Dolphins a bit of a chance but roll their eyes at Roger the Dodger's continued ineptness. And the beat goes on…literally.


October 17, 2015

Reach Out and Touch Someone, Mr. Shark

by Jerry Vovcsko

It's a bit of a paradox that in the midst of a weekend coldsnap – which will likely bring the first frost of the season- we should be hearing about additional signs of global warming. And that those signs happen to be originating in Alaska. Biologists say unusual fish are appearing near Alaska's shores, likely because of warmer ocean temperatures caused by El Nino and the patch of warm water known as "The Blob."

State fishery biologists based in Homer are amassing photos from people with bizarre sightings. Those include a 900-pound ocean sunfish near Juneau and warm-water thresher sharks around the coast of Yakutat, reported a local TV station. Other strange sightings include Pacific bonito near Ketchikan, albacore tuna around Prince of Wales Island and yellow tail near Sitka – all warmer clime species.
The peak of this year's particularly strong El Nino is coming up, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It's one of the strongest El Nino events on record. And NOAA says The Blob has also raised temperatures in the North Pacific to record highs.

Sunfish tend to prefer warmer waters than those usually found in Alaska, but there have been many sightings of the species this summer, according to state fisheries biologists who said two of them swam into researchers' gear while they conducted juvenile salmon surveys in the southeast this summer. The sunfish have probably been drawn to Alaska not only by warm currents but also a huge mass of jellyfish that has filled waters around Cordova.

The strange-ish sightings are interesting but might be a cause of serious concern because it's not at all clear how big-money fish like salmon will be affected if ocean temperatures rise. State records show that fewer pink salmon than expected were caught this year. If the salmon runs are affected adversely, it could have a serious economic impact on the state.

Commercial fishing is rated in the top five by insurance companies when compiling lists of the most dangerous occupations, which is one of the reasons that eighteen fishermen from around New England took to the seas of Hyannis Inner Harbor this past Friday for free training put on by a nonprofit group called Fishing Partnership Support Services.

The fishermen donned inflatable immersion suits, put out fires, plugged leaks, and lit flares, supervised and coached by Coast Guard-certified instructors from various companies and organizations involved in fishing safety and equipment.

Members of the U.S. Coast Guard and Massachusetts State Police also volunteered at the training. The Coast Guard brought a trailer, specifically designed for damage control training, which sprung leaks as the fishermen in teams of two took turns using various materials to stop the leaks. An occasional sharp change in pressure sent spurts up in the air, soaking the crowd of onlookers.

In the harbor, fishermen wearing inflatable immersion suits took turns stepping into the water and floating, as they practiced maneuvering in the suits and climbing into a life raft. Two state police divers hovered in the water nearby, which serves as both training for them and a comfort to the fishermen, who are not always experienced swimmers despite making a career out of being on the water.

Later in the daylong training came a life raft workshop and a firefighting lesson. The fishermen donned inflatable immersion suits, put out fires, plugged leaks, and lit flares, supervised and coached by Coast Guard-certified instructors from various companies and organizations involved in fishing safety and equipment.

The nonprofit started doing trainings in 2005 and now offers about 10 a year across New England. It has trained 2,700 fishermen in that time, said Vice President Andra Athos. In addition to the trainings, the group's other main effort is providing health insurance to commercial fishermen, only 10 percent of whom are insured, through the Affordable Care Act.

"A lot of these guys have lost friends or family members in accidents, and they're very committed to teaching this stuff and avoiding those kinds of tragedies," said one volunteer.

So how's the fishing these days?

Lively action was the order of the day at the Cape Cod Canal last week and some Large stripers were pulled from the water near the ice skating arena as well as around the "hundred steps" on the mainland side. Morning hours supplied plenty of top water action with school size bass and the jig&plastic crowd scored down deep with a couple of thirty pound "cows" taken later in the day.

Bluefish continue to linger in Nantucket Sound waters and the action picked up again around the Waquoit Jetty and along the beaches at Popponesset and South Cape. Further east, around the mouth of Bass River albies could still be seen chasing baitfish but these mini-tunas are pretty dodgy about hitting artificials and will soon be departing our waters.

This time of year I like to work the jetties along the south side of the Cape. Falmouth in particular has great access to the Sound from Menahaunt Beach all the way westward to Nobska Point. Along toward evening the odds of hooking up with a keeper size bass start to climb and ebbing tides at those jetties that bracket an outflow stream can occasionally scare up something seriously Large by drifting chunk or whole baits out with the current which, by the way, is a pretty effective sharking technique.

Back in the day, Falmouth locals would smack an eel against the rocks to stun it, then float it out on an outgoing tide aboard a shingle or small plank around dusk or dark. When it achieved sufficient distance, a quick jerk of the line would yank the eel off its sea-going platform into the water, reviving it and sometimes attracting sharks.

A few of the jokey-boys from town liked to load a dead five or six foot shark into the bed of a pickup truck and deliver it to a nearby phone booth. When the taverns emptied in the late night hours inebriated folks looking to call for a cab would find their phone booth occupied by strange denizen, indeed. Those were the days, eh?

And the New England Patriots Scorched Earth Tour pulls into Indianapolis this Sunday. There are those who feel Indy provided the impetus for the "Deflategate" hoo-hah that cost the Patriots a million bucks in fines plus the loss of draft choices – including a first rounder. So Pats fans hope the Colts get stomped into the turf as did Jerry Jones's Cowboys last week in Dallas. Payback, as they say, is a bitch and Jim Irsay's crew may be next in line for heaping helpings of Patriot served schadenfreude.

October 09, 2015

Eels In the Rivers and Stripers In the Canal

by Jerry Vovcsko

Anglers such as myself often view eels as cantankerous, obstinate critters that will knot themselves into an immovable mess and leak slime all over boat, gear and pretty much anything they come in contact with. Still, when it comes to catching big stripers, they are lighting in a bottle when livelined around where the jumbo bass dwell.

We sometimes complain about about how much they cost in the bait shop and daydream about setting an eel trap to work in some seagoing river and giving ourselves a never-ending source of bait for free. Well, pipedreams are fun but it seems some folks are actually catching the young eels and making themselves fistfuls of money in the process.

According to a recent Boston Globe article, Maine baby eels were worth more than $2,100 per pound in 2015, up from less than $100 per pound in 2009. The baby eels, called elvers, are sold to Asian aquaculture companies that raise them to maturity and use them as food. And those eel-trappers are particularly pleased that American eels will not be listed under the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service decided, a victory for fishermen who catch the increasingly valuable species.

The wildlife service rejected a petition from the California-based Center for Environmental Science, Accuracy & Reliability to list the eels — prized in Asian cuisine — as threatened. The petitioners had argued that the eels have lost more than 80 percent of their habitat and that the stock is jeopardized by commercial fishing. But the wildlife service issued a report saying that "there have been large declines in abundance from historical times," but the species "currently appears to be stable."

The wildlife service acknowledges that habitat loss and fishing have cut back eel populations in some areas, but say the fish's challenges do not rise to the level of listing under the Endangered Species Act. The eels' population is much lower than it was in the 1970s and '80s after a decline in the '90s and 2000s, but it appears to have stabilized, the service said.

And locally the Otis Fish & Game Club has been given a week's reprieve while the Massachusetts National Guard considers the future of the outdoors club at Joint Base Cape Cod. Club officials had been given until this past Thursday to vacate the club's building, a relic from the base's role as a World War II training ground. But state Rep. David Vieira, R-Falmouth, organized a meeting of Guard and club officials. Talks between the groups are continuing, Kenneth Teixeira, Otis Fish & Game president, said last week.

The club has a permit with the state Division of Fisheries & Wildlife and helps screen hunters who use the base, but officials have not had official permission to use the building since the 1980s. The Guard has said it wants to use the space for a morale, well-being and recreation center for soldiers, airmen and Coast Guardsmen at Joint Base Cape Cod. Sure would be nice if the Club and the military could work something out to permit usage for both parties.

There's tautog to be caught in the Cape Cod Canal and striper sitting in schools around the mouth of the Ditch up at the east end. That situation is probably a function of the impending fall migration and, chances are, lots of those fish will be moving through the canal before long.

Water temperatures in Nantucket Sound hover in the high fifties these days and that's down sufficiently from mid-summer highs of seventy degrees and upwards to remind the stripers that it'll soon be time for them to return home to the Hudson River or Chesapeake Bay.

Meanwhile, they're still hanging around; they appear to enjoy snacking on the myriad baitfish stacking up in inshore waters and it won't be long before they're heading south down the marine highway leaving us to count our summer successes and fantasize about next year.

The ‘tog are voracious eaters of green crabs and can be found down toward the Maritime Academy and, of course, a little further out in Buzzards Bay around Cleveland Ledge and the Weepeckett Islands. Tautog is a prime ingredient in a bouillabaisse and their white meat fillets really add flavor to the delicious fish concoction.
They're still catching stripers down along the Elizabeth Islands and the west side of Martha's Vineyard has been productive on the night tides. There were reports of an over-forty pound striper taken in the annual fishing Derby. Devil's Bridge is among the usual suspects delivering prime bass to anglers working jigs down along the bottom. Action has slowed at the Middleground lately but I always like to try a drift or two just in case some doormat fluke might be hanging around.

And they're still catching funny fish in the Sound between Woods Hole and as far east as Monomoy. Right now is probably the Last Hurrah for albies, though…they, along with bluefish, will be moving out soon. Of course, the real problem has been the weather. Warnings of hurricane possibilities and the 12-foot swells we saw along the Truro to Nauset beaches kept the small boat fleets tied to the docks and they'll be getting back into action now that it looks like better forecasts are shaping up.

Those south facing estuaries are still good places to visit as they remain sheltered from high winds, hold plenty of baitfish and offer good pickings to some of the smaller bass and blues still lingering in our waters. Great Pond and Eel Pond are a couple of likely places to wet a line.

But come four o' clock on Sunday I can be found parked in front of the old flat-screen getting ready for the day's game. The New England Patriots' Scorched Earth Tour swings into Dallas this weekend and I doubt Belichick/Brady and Company will forget Jerry Jones' role in urging the NFL to punish the Pats for whatever "DeflateGate" was supposed to be all about. Fantasy football players will likely want to add Brady and Gronkowski to their rosters for this one. Dallas fans' cries of "running up the score" will be sweet music to New Englanders' ears. And, say, what's that cackling sound, Jerry? Could it be the Deflategate chickens coming home to roost?












October 04, 2015

Hurricane Joaquin Passing Through

by Jerry Vovcsko

With Hurricane Joaquin barreling up the coast bringing coastal flooding and hundred-mile-an-hour winds to the region there's no telling what fall fishing in Cape Cod waters will look like once Joaquin passes. Typically, fish feed like crazy during the few days before a hurricane arrives and then seem to disappear once it passes.

One of the best descriptions of hurricane conditions and the aftermath can be found in the late Phil Schwind's book "Cape Cod Fisherman" when he got caught out in one. Schwind made a living skippering a small charter boat back in the thirties, forties and fifties and describes what it was like before NOAA, the Coast Guard and a plethora of computer assisted weather forecaster tracked storms every step of the way.

At the moment it looks like Joaquin will track past us well offshore so the Cape will probably only register buckets of rain, high wind gusts and minor flooding during the high tides. But there's a chance. Question is: what effect will it have on the fall migration? We'll know by mid-week when it's due to have passed through the area.

As if things weren't dismal enough on the commercial fishing scene, a Boston Globe article says one of the two critical areas where New England fishermen search for cod may be in even worse shape than suspected. Fishing managers already knew cod stocks in Georges Bank were thin, but new data from the Northeast Fisheries Science Center says research boats caught less of the fish this past spring than in all but one spring season dating back to 1968.

A report from the center, says that the boats caught about 3.3 pounds of cod each time the net went in and out of the water last spring, compared to more than three times that amount two years earlier. Those numbers were routinely more than 20 pounds per trip in the late 1980s. Regulators and marine scientists have said overfishing hit the stock hard and warming oceans could be making it worse.

Meanwhile, the fishing's been pretty good locally and the Cape Cod Canal has been the marine version of Times Square, aka, the Crossroads-of-the-World. In the fishy environment of the Cape, it seems the word got out on the Coconut Telegraph that all manner of baitfish were holed up in The Ditch and every kind of predator showed up for the seven-mile buffet.

Stripers, blues, albies, dogfish and who-knows-what came calling last week and anglers had a heyday casting into breaking fish from the east end on down to the Maritime Academy at varying times. Needle plugs, jig and plastic combos, metal slabs…just about anything that could reach the sporadic blitz action took fish. It doesn't happen very often, but when it does, this kind of spectacular action reminds anglers why it is they put up with lousy weather, long hikes to the too-crowded good spots, and newbies casting over their lines.

The passing storm will probably affect the outer beaches the most. Race Point, Head of the Meadow, Balston and Nauset beaches will almost certainly get churned up by the surf. I drove over to Coast Guard Beach Saturday to check out the ocean and fifteen-foot battered the shoreline with the beach area to the south a mass of raging froth. It was so wild not even one surfer was in sight. Signs along the parking lot warned would-be swimmers that "Great White Sharks visit these waters". Looked to me like even the Great Whites would have found those surf condition challenging.

Best bet right now is to hit the bays and estuaries in Nantucket Sound that offer some protection from the high winds and heavy surf. Great Pond in Falmouth and the Waquoit area will likely be harboring bass and blues and cruising these places in skiff or kayak should bring good results. But pay attention to the weather because we won't be out of the woods until Hurricane Joaquin puts us in the rear view mirror and falls apart up there in those chilly Canadian waters.

It's the bye-week for the Patriots and I think I'll put in some heavy couch time watching other teams beat up on each other while our guys get a chance to heal those nicks and bruises from the first three weeks of the season. The Jets and Dolphins go at it over in London, England and whichever one loses falls another game behind the Pats in the race to the Playoffs. Life is good.
































































































































































































































With Hurricane Joaquin barreling up the coast bringing coastal flooding and hundred-mile-an-hour winds to the region there's no telling what fall fishing in Cape Cod waters will look like once Joaquin passes. Typically, fish feed like crazy during the few days before a hurricane arrives and then seem to disappear once it passes.

One of the best descriptions of hurricane conditions and the aftermath can be found in the late Phil Schwind's book "Cape Cod Fisherman" when he got caught out in one. Schwind made a living skippering a small charter boat back in the thirties, forties and fifties and describes what it was like before NOAA, the Coast Guard and a plethora of computer assisted weather forecaster tracked storms every step of the way.

At the moment it looks like Joaquin will track past us well offshore so the Cape will probably only register buckets of rain, high wind gusts and minor flooding during the high tides. But there's a chance. Question is: what effect will it have on the fall migration? We'll know by mid-week when it's due to have passed through the area.

As if things weren't dismal enough on the commercial fishing scene, a Boston Globe article says one of the two critical areas where New England fishermen search for cod may be in even worse shape than suspected. Fishing managers already knew cod stocks in Georges Bank were thin, but new data from the Northeast Fisheries Science Center says research boats caught less of the fish this past spring than in all but one spring season dating back to 1968.

A report from the center, says that the boats caught about 3.3 pounds of cod each time the net went in and out of the water last spring, compared to more than three times that amount two years earlier. Those numbers were routinely more than 20 pounds per trip in the late 1980s. Regulators and marine scientists have said overfishing hit the stock hard and warming oceans could be making it worse.

Meanwhile, the fishing's been pretty good locally and the Cape Cod Canal has been the marine version of Times Square, aka, the Crossroads-of-the-World. In the fishy environment of the Cape, it seems the word got out on the Coconut Telegraph that all manner of baitfish were holed up in The Ditch and every kind of predator showed up for the seven-mile buffet.

Stripers, blues, albies, dogfish and who-knows-what came calling last week and anglers had a heyday casting into breaking fish from the east end on down to the Maritime Academy at varying times. Needle plugs, jig and plastic combos, metal slabs…just about anything that could reach the sporadic blitz action took fish. It doesn't happen very often, but when it does, this kind of spectacular action reminds anglers why it is they put up with lousy weather, long hikes to the too-crowded good spots, and newbies casting over their lines.

The passing storm will probably affect the outer beaches the most. Race Point, Head of the Meadow, Balston and Nauset beaches will almost certainly get churned up by the surf. I drove over to Coast Guard Beach Saturday to check out the ocean and fifteen-foot battered the shoreline with the beach area to the south a mass of raging froth. It was so wild not even one surfer was in sight. Signs along the parking lot warned would-be swimmers that "Great White Sharks visit these waters". Looked to me like even the Great Whites would have found those surf condition challenging.

Best bet right now is to hit the bays and estuaries in Nantucket Sound that offer some protection from the high winds and heavy surf. Great Pond in Falmouth and the Waquoit area will likely be harboring bass and blues and cruising these places in skiff or kayak should bring good results. But pay attention to the weather because we won't be out of the woods until Hurricane Joaquin puts us in the rear view mirror and falls apart up there in those chilly Canadian waters.

It's the bye-week for the Patriots and I think I'll put in some heavy couch time watching other teams beat up on each other while our guys get a chance to heal those nicks and bruises from the first three weeks of the season. The Jets and Dolphins go at it over in London, England and whichever one loses falls another game behind the Pats in the race to the Playoffs. Life is good.

















































































































































































































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With Hurricane Joaquin barreling up the coast bringing coastal flooding and hundred-mile-an-hour winds to the region there's no telling what fall fishing in Cape Cod waters will look like once Joaquin passes. Typically, fish feed like crazy during the few days before a hurricane arrives and then seem to disappear once it passes.

One of the best descriptions of hurricane conditions and the aftermath can be found in the late Phil Schwind's book "Cape Cod Fisherman" when he got caught out in one. Schwind made a living skippering a small charter boat back in the thirties, forties and fifties and describes what it was like before NOAA, the Coast Guard and a plethora of computer assisted weather forecaster tracked storms every step of the way.

At the moment it looks like Joaquin will track past us well offshore so the Cape will probably only register buckets of rain, high wind gusts and minor flooding during the high tides. But there's a chance. Question is: what effect will it have on the fall migration? We'll know by mid-week when it's due to have passed through the area.

As if things weren't dismal enough on the commercial fishing scene, a Boston Globe article says one of the two critical areas where New England fishermen search for cod may be in even worse shape than suspected. Fishing managers already knew cod stocks in Georges Bank were thin, but new data from the Northeast Fisheries Science Center says research boats caught less of the fish this past spring than in all but one spring season dating back to 1968.

A report from the center, says that the boats caught about 3.3 pounds of cod each time the net went in and out of the water last spring, compared to more than three times that amount two years earlier. Those numbers were routinely more than 20 pounds per trip in the late 1980s. Regulators and marine scientists have said overfishing hit the stock hard and warming oceans could be making it worse.

Meanwhile, the fishing's been pretty good locally and the Cape Cod Canal has been the marine version of Times Square, aka, the Crossroads-of-the-World. In the fishy environment of the Cape, it seems the word got out on the Coconut Telegraph that all manner of baitfish were holed up in The Ditch and every kind of predator showed up for the seven-mile buffet.

Stripers, blues, albies, dogfish and who-knows-what came calling last week and anglers had a heyday casting into breaking fish from the east end on down to the Maritime Academy at varying times. Needle plugs, jig and plastic combos, metal slabs…just about anything that could reach the sporadic blitz action took fish. It doesn't happen very often, but when it does, this kind of spectacular action reminds anglers why it is they put up with lousy weather, long hikes to the too-crowded good spots, and newbies casting over their lines.

The passing storm will probably affect the outer beaches the most. Race Point, Head of the Meadow, Balston and Nauset beaches will almost certainly get churned up by the surf. I drove over to Coast Guard Beach Saturday to check out the ocean and fifteen-foot battered the shoreline with the beach area to the south a mass of raging froth. It was so wild not even one surfer was in sight. Signs along the parking lot warned would-be swimmers that "Great White Sharks visit these waters". Looked to me like even the Great Whites would have found those surf condition challenging.

Best bet right now is to hit the bays and estuaries in Nantucket Sound that offer some protection from the high winds and heavy surf. Great Pond in Falmouth and the Waquoit area will likely be harboring bass and blues and cruising these places in skiff or kayak should bring good results. But pay attention to the weather because we won't be out of the woods until Hurricane Joaquin puts us in the rear view mirror and falls apart up there in those chilly Canadian waters.

It's the bye-week for the Patriots and I think I'll put in some heavy couch time watching other teams beat up on each other while our guys get a chance to heal those nicks and bruises from the first three weeks of the season. The Jets and Dolphins go at it over in London, England and whichever one loses falls another game behind the Pats in the race to the Playoffs. Life is good.

















































































































































































































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