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Frank Ruczynski

I've spent the last twenty-five years chasing the fish that swim in our local waters and I've enjoyed every minute of it! During that time, I've made some remarkable friends and together we've learned a great deal by spending loads of time on the water.

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October 21, 2016

Get out for TROUT!

by Frank Ruczynski

The fall trout stocking is complete. Many of our local ponds, lakes and rivers are teeming with big, beautiful rainbow trout. Over the last two weeks, the New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife stocked more than 21,000 trout throughout state waters. These aren't the little trout we see in the spring on Opening Day; the average-sized, fall trout is about 15 inches with many larger specimens up to 22 inches. Trout fishing in October is nothing short of remarkable – some of these fish look like salmon!


South Jersey Salmon?

With great weather and literally truckloads of trout riding through South Jersey, I felt like I was in heaven. I fished lakes, ponds and rivers and had giant trout swimming in every direction. The Pequest Trout Hatchery does a wonderful job raising these trout and I'd like to thank them for making the most of our trout stamp fees. It feels strange thanking a state agency, but I definitely got my $10.50's worth.


How much is this fish worth?

This paragraph is my asterisk - I'm not going to pretend that fishing for stocked trout is the same experience as fishing a pristine, native trout stream in Northern New Jersey, Pennsylvania or New York, but the big trout are dropped right in our backyards and are put there for the sole purpose of fishing enjoyment. Some may consider this "fishing in a barrel" and for good reason, but I wonder how many people actually tried to catch a fish in a barrel? I can tell you from experience, these fish aren't as easy to catch as some may think. While fishing for stocked trout may not be as prestigious as some other types of fishing, it is fun – lots of fun! Catch rates are usually high, you don't have to feel guilty when taking a fish or four home and the odds of battling a trophy fish are likely higher in your own backyard than they would be just about anywhere else on the planet.


Trout like this are swimming in your backyard right now!

I've been fishing for stocked trout for years and I've learned a few things during my time on the water. The hatchery fish usually seem to be a little sluggish at first, as the trout need some time to acclimate to their new surroundings. The larger fish seem to take a little longer than the younger, smaller fish. In my experiences, rainbow trout seem a little easier to catch and a lot less particular than brook and brown trout – maybe that's another reason the state only stocks rainbow trout now? The stocked trout set up and behave differently depending on the location. At ponds, it seems like they roam around drop offs, points and lay downs. On the larger lakes, the trout seem to head straight for dams and spillways – the concrete spillways are like trout magnets. When fishing on creeks and rivers, undercut banks and deep pools seem to be likely fish holding areas. Years ago, I thought of trout as more of an open water roaming fish, but the state stockies often seem to prefer cover. I've lost quite a few fish in lay downs and log jams.


This one didn't get away!

There are many effective techniques used to catch trout. Fly-fishing, casting lures and bait fishing seem to work well. In my opinion, Berkley PowerBait Trout Bait is one of the most effective way to catch trout, but it's not as much fun as tossing inline spinners. If water temperatures are very low, I'll yield and use PowerBait, but if temps are above 50, I'll be tossing spinners. I came across a certain spinner a few years back and it's been my go-to for the stocked rainbow trout. It's a spinner named the Double Spinn, made by Thomas and I prefer the Nickel/Gold color pattern. The spinner is heavy enough to cover a lot of water when casting. The twin blades offer a tremendous amount of flash, which catches the attention of any nearby trout. The double blades also allow for a slow sink rate so I can impart a little more action into the spinner. After having many follows by trout without strikes, I learned that a little jig every once in a while would trigger a strike. I can accomplish the same action with smaller, lighter spinners, but they don't put off the same flash and I can't cover water with the smaller spinners like I can with the Double Spinn. If you're going out for trout, do yourself a favor and make sure to have a couple of these in your bag.


The Thomas Double Spinn strikes again!

The fall trout stocking days are like holidays in my family. I asked Jake if he wanted to take two days off from school to fish for trout and he couldn't have been happier. Before I get reprimanded, don't teachers get a few vacation days? Well, I think the kids should too. I wasn't quite sure how to write a note excusing his absence - trout fever? Looking back, I'm sure the memories we made over the last few days will last a lifetime.


I gave Jake an A+

Jake and I had a great time trying for the stocked rainbows this week. We even had a few of the locations all to ourselves. Imagine Opening Day of Trout Season, but with much larger trout, better weather and no crowds – yes, that's it. I am a little surprised the big fall trout don't receive a little more attention from South Jersey anglers. If you knew what you're missing out on, you may choose to celebrate the Opening Day of Trout Season in October from now on!

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