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Frank Ruczynski

I've spent the last twenty-five years chasing the fish that swim in our local waters and I've enjoyed every minute of it! During that time, I've made some remarkable friends and together we've learned a great deal by spending loads of time on the water.

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October 21, 2015

New Jersey's Fall Rainbow Trout

by Frank Ruczynski

The 2015 New Jersey fall stocking season is complete as thousands of big, beautiful rainbow trout are now swimming in our South Jersey lakes, ponds, and rivers. The trout-stocking trucks made frequent stops in which they unloaded tons of hefty 14 to 22-inch rainbow trout. Usually, angler participation is low compared to the spring trout fishery, so these big trout should be swimming in our waters well into the winter season and maybe as long as next spring. If you enjoy the spring trout action, you'll love the bigger fall trout.


An Average Fall Rainbow Trout

After twenty-five years of fishing for trout in South Jersey, the fall stocking is clearly my favorite time to fish, as the state only puts in two sizes of trout – big and bigger. More times than not, your biggest spring trout will be smaller than your smallest fall trout. The bigger fish fight a lot better and seem to fit the dinner plate perfectly. Throw in daytime highs around 70 degrees and a backdrop of beautiful fall foliage and it's difficult to find a reason not to fish for these brawny rainbow trout.


A Day at the Trout Pond

I guess I need to write a disclaimer - fishing for stocked trout is not the same as fishing for wild trout; we're certainly not fishing gin-clear, mountain streams in Montana. This is New Jersey and the trout are strategically placed by the state to offer the best chance for anglers to capture them. The South Jersey trout fishery is often referenced as a "put-and-take" fishery. The truth is most if not all trout would die in many of our waterways as summer water temperatures rise well into the 80s. Think about it like a fish market where we're allowed to fish for our meals. The words glamorous or sporting don't usually come to mind when talking about stocked fish, but it sure can be a lot of fun!


Jake is having fun!

Fishing for stocked trout isn't always as easy as some may think. The trout take anywhere from a few hours to a few days to acclimate to their new waters. In my experiences, rainbow trout are far more aggressive and take much less time to adapt to their new surroundings. Sometimes, it seemed like the brown and brook trout took weeks before they really starting biting. Since the furunculosis outbreak at the Pequest Hatchery, the Division has decided to stock only rainbow trout, which should bode well for anglers.

When the trout truck visits our area, I usually go on a two to three day trout-fishing binge. I let my son, Jake, take a day or two off of school and we chase trout all over South Jersey. It's about as close as either of us will get to trout fishing in Montana. We fish ponds, lakes and rivers for no other reason than we like catching lots of big trout. Sometimes the fishing action is fast and furious, while other times, it's a very specific bite that can be quite challenging.

Over the last two days, we've hit three different waterways – a lake, a river and a pond. The fishing action was good at each venue, however the trout responded a little differently at each location. In the shallow lake, the trout were rather lethargic and difficult to tempt with any offerings. I believe many of the trout we caught at the lake struck our spinners more out of aggravation than hunger. After some time, I switched over to a Trout Magnet and a slower, jigging presentation and the trout responded nicely.


This big male rainbow trout hit a gold Trout Magnet.

After we had fun at the lake, we headed over to the river. When we arrived, I could see trout zipping in and out of the deeper pools. These trout seemed spooky and full of energy. Many of the larger trout were holding along the banks in the deeper cuts. These fish would only hit if we presented from upstream and we let our spinners sit almost still in the current – the spinner would sit in place with only the blades spinning. While the bite was a little more specific at the river, the current and surroundings felt much more trout-like.


Jake with a River Rainbow

This afternoon, we visited a small sand wash pond. Crystal-clear water with nice drop-offs presented lots of visuals. We found big schools of trout holding wherever we saw down trees. I was a bit surprised, as I always believed trout preferred open waters, especially when no current is present. I tried my go-to Trout Magnet as I could jig it in and around the underwater branches, but I couldn't buy a hit. I switched back to a double-bladed spinner and I had trout on almost every cast. My best catch of the day put up a real fight, as it seemed to swim through every underwater branch on our side of the pond. I was happy when the big male trout finally came to the net.


Another Big Rainbow Trout from This Afternoon's Trip

Looking back at our two-day trout-a-thon, Jake and I had a tremendous amount of fun. It wasn't the most challenging type of fishing or the most glamorous, but we had a good time. I'm sure some will scoff at our super-sized stocked trout – it's ok, we know all about the stocked trout and enjoy it for everything it's worth!

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